kidney transplant


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kidney transplant

The insertion of a donated kidney into the body and connection of its blood vessels to the host vessels and its ureter to the host bladder. The donated kidney is usually placed in the right side of the pelvis, alongside the bladder and connected to the ILIAC vessels. The results of kidney transplantation are excellent, with success in more than 80% of cases.

kidney

either of the two organs in the lumbar region that filter the blood, excreting the end-products of body metabolism in the form of urine, and regulating the concentrations of hydrogen, sodium, potassium, phosphate and other ions in the extracellular fluid. Bean-shaped in the dog, cat, sheep and laboratory animals, lobed in the ox and some fetal animals such as the horse; irregularly lobed in birds. See also renal.
Enlarge picture
Dog kidney. By permission from Sack W, Wensing CJG, Dyce KM, Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy, Saunders, 2002

artificial kidney
an extracorporeal device used as a substitute for nonfunctioning kidneys to remove endogenous metabolites from the blood, or as an emergency measure to remove exogenous poisons such as barbiturates. Called also hemodialyzer.
balloon kidney
meat hygiene term for cystic kidney.
basal lamina kidney
part of the filtration barrier of the kidney; is much thicker than most basal laminae.
cake kidney
a solid, irregularly lobed organ of bizarre shape, formed by fusion of the two renal anlagen. Called also lump kidney.
cicatricial kidney
a shriveled, irregular and scarred kidney due to suppurative pyelonephritis.
contracted kidney
an atrophic kidney that may be scarred and granular.
duplicate kidney
occurs in most species, without apparent increase in total renal mass.
enlarged kidney
may be due to polycystic kidney disease, hydronephrosis, pyelonephritis or congenital absence of one kidney resulting in hypertrophy of the other.
fatty kidney
one affected with fatty degeneration.
floating kidney
one that is freely movable, especially a human kidney (normally more firmly fixed than those in quadrupeds); called also hypermobile kidney. See also nephroptosis.
Enlarge picture
Bovine kidney. By permission from Sack W, Wensing CJG, Dyce KM, Textbook of Veterinary Anatomy, Saunders, 2002
fused kidney
a single anomalous organ developed as a result of fusion of the renal anlagen.
giant kidney worm
Goldblatt kidney
one with obstruction of its blood flow, resulting in renal hypertension. Produced experimentally in dogs.
horseshoe kidney
an anomalous organ resulting from fusion of the corresponding poles of the renal anlagen.
hypermobile kidney
one that is freely movable; called also floating kidney. See also nephroptosis.
lump kidney
cake kidney.
kidney meridian points
acupuncture points on the kidney meridian.
pelvic kidney
a kidney which has failed to ascend from its primordial site to the roof of the abdomen.
polycystic kidney disease
the most common congenital renal defect but most cases are sporadic and do not cause clinical illness because there is still sufficient renal mass to avoid uremia. In some cases the enlarged kidney is detected incidentally during a clinical examination. Rarely both kidneys are badly involved and the animal is dead at birth or dies soon afterwards. In some cases, there are signs of progressive renal failure, perhaps not until later in life. The defect is inherited in Persian cats, Cairn terriers and pigs. In Cairn terriers, cysts may also occur in the liver. See also feline perirenal cysts.
pulpy kidney disease
see Clostridium perfringensenterotoxemia.
kidney scan
radioimaging of a kidney by the use of a rectilinear scanner after the intravenous administration of a radiopaque material.
kidney stones
supernumerary kidney
additional kidneys which develop as a consequence of two ureteric buds arising from one mesonephric duct so that two kidneys develop on the one side.
kidney transplant
commonly and successfully performed in experimental dogs. Increasingly used as a therapeutic procedure in clinical veterinary medicine for renal failure in cats and dogs.
turkey egg kidney
a speckled pattern caused by hemorrhagic glomeruli in diseases such as porcine erysipelas.
wandering kidney
floating or hypermobile kidney. See also nephroptosis.
waxy kidney
amyloid kidney.
white-spotted kidney
focal nonsuppurative interstitial nephritis, seen most commonly in calves.
References in periodicals archive ?
When considering cholesterol as a risk factor for kidney transplant patients, clinicians ought to look beyond the Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines, which did not take chronic kidney disease into account, he said.
Last year, so-called "altruistic donors", who do not know the people who will receive their organ, accounted for just 3% of living donor kidney transplants.
When it did occur, lupus nephritis led to a 4-fold increased relative risk of kidney transplant failure; however, the overall risk for the loss of the new organ attributed to lupus developing in the transplanted kidneys was only 7pct.
The kidney transplant was the first of its kind being done on a child in Qatar.
Staff for the kidney transplant clinic will fly from Salt Lake to St.
He said this was one more than last year and brings the total number of deceased and living donor kidney transplants to 161.
This study extends some of these findings to kidney transplant patients.
Following a kidney transplant, most people experience side effects due primarily to the cortisone treatments which accompany the procedure.
NICK WEST, transplant coordinator at the University Hospital, Walsgrave, has been performing kidney transplants for the past 20 years.
More than 80 000 Americans are awaiting kidney transplants.
Birmingham's Deputy Lord Mayor, Coun Mike Sharpe (Lab, Tyburn), underwent a live kidney transplant - receiving an organ donated by his wife Thelma - at the QE.
Kidney transplant recipients must take costly medications to avoid transplant failure.