limiting factor

(redirected from key factor)
Also found in: Dictionary, Financial.

limiting factor

  1. (in chemical processes) a component that limits the amount of the product that can be formed or its rate of formation, because it is present in small quantities. For example, light intensity can be a limiting factor in PHOTOSYNTHESIS.
  2. (in ecology) a factor that restricts the numbers of a population, such as food or nest sites.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, we should look at the coefficients suggested by the above authors as indices for identifying a key factor (in each author's own interpretation) rather unrelated to the usual regression and correlation analyses.
Young: The key factor was that we had assembled a building committee of experts.
A key factor is having the parts on hand needed to fix the equipment.
Two key factors were the "drivers" of this upswing in economic growth.
Integration of DSPs and network processing on the same chip offers improvement in delay optimization, a key factor in achieving carrier-class voice quality.
The researchers also expand on previous calculations indicating that a key factor in male predominance is the bumblebee male's tendency to mature before the female.
Cetra/Ruddy's capability of responding quickly, experience with construction issues as well as innovative building materials and technology was also a key factor.
A version of the D4 dopamine receptor gene, or D4DR, cited as a key factor in producing novelty-seeking behavior (SN: 1/6/96, p.
The key factor in producing a frozen droplet with a sharp point is the difference between the angle that the solid makes with the solidification front during freezing and the angle that the liquid makes with the front.
"The scalability of transaction based systems using CACHE is a key factor in our decision.
A key factor influencing dendritic growth is the convective currents of heat flowing in molten metal.
According to TWR, New Jersey is seeing a huge comeback in investment banking activity--a key factor in the greater tri-state area--as companies become less risk adverse and take advantage of current market conditions.