precision attachment

(redirected from key attachment)

pre·ci·sion at·tach·ment

1. a frictional or mechanically retained unit used in fixed or removable prosthodontics, consisting of closely fitting male and female parts;
2. an attachment that may be rigid in function or may incorporate a movable stress control unit to reduce the torque on the abutment.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

pre·ci·sion at·tach·ment

(prē-sizhŭn ă-tachmĕnt)
1. Frictional or mechanically retained unit used in fixed or removable prosthodontics.
2. Attachment that may be rigid in function or may incorporate a movable stress control unit to reduce the torque on the abutment.
Synonym(s): frictional attachment, internal attachment, key attachment, keyway attachment, parallel attachment, slotted attachment.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

pre·ci·sion at·tach·ment

(prē-sizhŭn ă-tachmĕnt)
1. Frictional or mechanically retained unit used in fixed or removable prosthodontics, consisting of closely fitting male and female parts. The receptacle (matrix) is typically contained within the abutment crown with the precision fitting extension (patrix) attached to the pontic or removable prosthesis.
2. Attachment that may be rigid in function or may incorporate a movable stress control unit to reduce torque on the abutment.
Synonym(s): internal attachment, key attachment, keyway attachment.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
There is also an internal hydration sleeve, a key attachment clip and a microfleece goggle pocket among many other attractions.
Think about your clients and reflect on how to explore with them whether they live part of their life being physically isolated from significant people in their lives and key attachment relationships.
Arguably, all adoptees have an adverse start to life, with at the very least a challenge to their key attachment relationships and possibly additional losses as well.
His response to the departure of his key attachment figure (male staff member) started a sequence of protest behaviors that began by proximity seeking but could quickly evolve into highly maladaptive destructive behaviors (SIB).