indole

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indole

 [in´dōl]
a compound obtained from coal tar and indigo and produced by decomposition of tryptophan in the intestine, where it contributes to the peculiar odor of feces. It is excreted in the urine in the form of indican.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·dole

(in'dōl), Avoid the misspelling indol.
1. basis of many biologically active substances (for example, serotonin, tryptophan); formed in degradation of tryptophan. Synonym(s): ketole
2. Any of many alkaloids containing the indole (1) structure.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

indole

(ĭn′dōl′)
n.
1. A white crystalline compound, C8H7N, obtained from coal tar or various plants and produced by the bacterial decomposition of tryptophan in the intestine. It is used in perfumes and as a reagent.
2. Any of various derivatives of this compound.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

indole

Chemistry
A heterocyclic compound that is the parent molecule for serotonin tryptophan and other alkaloids; indoles are present in broccoli, cabbage and other cruciferous vegetables, and may have anticarcinogenic activity.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

in·dole

(in'dōl)
1. 2,3-benzopyrrole; basis of many biologically active substances (e.g., serotonin, tryptophan); formed in degradation of tryptophan.
Synonym(s): ketole.
2. Any of many alkaloids containing the indole (1) structure.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

indole

2,3-benzopyrrole, an unpleasant-smelling product of protein breakdown that contributes to the odour of the faeces. In high dilution, indole has a pleasant smell and has been used in the perfumery industry. See also SKATOLE.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005