ketoacidosis


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ketoacidosis

 [ke″to-as″ĭ-do´sis]
the accumulation of ketone bodies in the blood, which results in metabolic acidosis; it is often associated with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. See also ketosis.

ke·to·ac·i·do·sis

(kē'tō-as'i-dō'sis),
Acidosis, as in diabetes or starvation, caused by the enhanced production of ketone bodies.

ketoacidosis

(kē′tō-ăs′ĭ-dō′sĭs)
n. pl. ketoaci·doses (-dō′sēz)
1. Metabolic acidosis caused by an abnormally high concentration of ketone bodies in the blood and body tissues.
2. This condition occurring as a complication of untreated or improperly controlled diabetes mellitus, especially type 1 diabetes, characterized by thirst, fatigue, a fruity odor on the breath, and other symptoms, and having the potential to progress to coma or death. Also called diabetic ketoacidosis.

ketoacidosis

Diabetic ketoacidosis, DKA A type of metabolic acidosis seen in poorly controlled DM, with 'starvation amidst plenty'; despite hyperglycemia, ↓ insulin makes the excess glucose unavailable to the cells, which rely on lipid metabolites–ketone bodies–for energy, due to incomplete lipid metabolism Clinical Systemic acidosis, ↓ cardiac contractility and vascular response to catecholamines with thready pulse, hypotension, poor organ perfusion and diabetic ketoacidosis may be the presenting sign in previously undiagnosed DM, accompanied by an acute abdomen and marked leukocytosis Lab Ketonuria, ketonemia, hyperglycemia, glycosuria, ↓ pH, ↓ bicarbonate, ↑ anion gap, hyperlipidemia. See Alcoholic ketoacidosis.

ke·to·ac·i·do·sis

(kē'tō-as-i-dō'sis)
Acidosis, as in diabetes mellitus or starvation, caused by the enhanced production of ketone bodies.

ketoacidosis

See KETOSIS.

Ketoacidosis

A condition due to starvation or uncontrolled Type I diabetes. Ketones are acid compounds that form in the blood when the body breaks down fats and proteins. Symptoms include abdominal pain, vomiting, rapid breathing, extreme tiredness, and drowsiness.

ke·to·ac·i·do·sis

(kē'tō-as-i-dō'sis)
Acidosis, as in diabetes or starvation, caused by enhanced production of ketone bodies.
References in periodicals archive ?
Park, "Euglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis: an easily missed diagnosis," Chest, vol.
A 22-year-old woman with a history of diabetes mellitus (diagnosed at 7 years old) is treated with insulin glargine and with good adherence to treatment, with hypothyroidism and 2 previous ICU admissions due to diabetic ketoacidosis in which blood glucose levels were greater than 300 mg/dL.
Wall, "Diabetic ketoacidosis," Medical Clinics of North America, vol.
By increasing insulin resistance, isoproterenol may increase the risk of diabetic ketoacidosis. Early recognition and prompt treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis are crucial, because the condition may lead to cerebral edema, severe hypokalemia, and death.
The students had to analyze together a case with diabetes ketoacidosis and they had very active and productive discussions.
In this study, we aimed to determine QTc prolongation and other changes that might develop on ECG during DKA or diabetic ketosis (DK) and the correlation of these changes with serum electrolytes and ketoacidosis in patients with diabetes mellitus.
Caption: Insulin pump use protects kids from ketoacidosis and severe hypoglycemia.
Individuals with Type 1 diabetes who choose to fast are at a higher risk of developing ketoacidosis, especially if they have been experiencing hyperglycemia in the weeks leading up to Ramadan.
One of the first findings was a delay in diagnosing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA).
Pitchumoni, "Association of diabetic ketoacidosis and acute pancreatitis: observations in 100 consecutive episodes of DKA," The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol.
The researchers identified 42 reports of euglycemic diabetes ketoacidosis (EDKA) and five cases of hyperglycemic diabetic ketoacidosis (HDKA) from 33 publications.
The efficacy of low-dose versus conventional therapy of insulin for treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. Ann Intern Med 1976;84(6):633-638.