keratomileusis


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Related to keratomileusis: LASIK, keratophakia, epikeratoplasty

keratomileusis

 [ker″ah-to-mĭ-loo´sis]
keratoplasty in which a slice of the patient's cornea is removed, shaped to the desired curvature, and then sutured back on the remaining cornea to correct optical error.
laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) keratoplasty in which the excimer laser and microkeratome are combined for vision correction; the microkeratome is used to shave a thin slice and create a hinged flap in the cornea, the flap is reflected back, the exposed cornea is reshaped by the laser, and the flap is replaced, without sutures, to heal back into position.

ker·a·to·mi·leu·sis

(ker'ă-tō-mī-lū'sis),
Surgical alteration of refractive error by changing the shape of a deep layer of the cornea: the anterior lamella is peeled back, frozen, and recarved on its back surface on a lathe; some of the corneal stroma can be removed from the bed with a laser or a knife.
[coinage, prob. fr. G. keras (kerat-), horn, cornea, + smileusis, carving]

keratomileusis

(kĕr′ə-tō-mə-lo͞o′sĭs)
n.
Eye surgery in which refractive disorders are corrected by reshaping an inner layer of the cornea, formerly performed by freezing corneal layers and forming them to a new curvature, but now usually performed using a laser.

ker·a·to·mi·leu·sis

(ker'ă-tō-mī-lū'sis)
Surgical alteration of refractive error by changing the shape of a deep layer of the cornea.
[coinage, prob. fr. G. keras (kerat-), horn, cornea, + smileusis, carving]

keratomileusis

A surgical procedure on the cornea aimed at correcting ametropia. An anterior layer of the cornea is sliced off with a microkeratome, frozen, ground to a new curvature and sutured back in the same location. There are many complications and technical difficulties associated with this procedure. Syn. refractive keratoplasty and keratorefractive surgery (both terms also include epikeratoplasty, keratophakia and radial keratotomy). See epikeratoplasty; Intacs; photorefractive keratectomy; keratome; keratophakia; LASEK; LASIK.
References in periodicals archive ?
Koller DL, Price MO (1999)- central corneal pachymetry in patients undergoing laser in situ keratomileusis ophthalmology 106; 2216-2220, also quoted the same.
Different procedures have been used in refractive surgery which include photorefractive keratectomy (PRK), radical keratotomy (RK), laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK), laser thermal keratoplasty (LTK), small incision lenticule extraction (SMILE) etc.4 Refractive surgeries with laser flap makers were approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1999 and femtosecond specifically for flap creation was approved in 2001.5 Femtosecond laser-assisted LASIK (femto-LASIK) is very successful latest innovation in refractive surgery because of its better outcome, long-term stable results, and lesser complications compared to other procedures.6 Femtosecond uses ultra-short duration of the pulses (10-15) causing significantly less damage to the collateral tissues.
Hertzog, "Effect of laser in situ keratomileusis on optic nerve head topography and retinal nerve fiber layer thickness," Journal of Cataract and Refractive Surgery, vol.
Measurement of corneal curvature change after mechanical laser in situ keratomileusis flap creation and femtosecond laser flap creation.
Fundingsland, "Laser in situ keratomileusis for the correction of residual ametropia after penetrating keratoplasty," Journal of Cataract &Refractive Surgery, vol.
Since laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) has been proposed [1], it has been widely accepted as a useful refractive surgical technique noted for effective outcomes in the correction of refractive errors [2-9].
(7,10,13,14,15,16,17) Several studies have evaluated the changes in biomechanical properties resulting from laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and PRK, which have been employed for many years to treat myopia, as well as the SMILE procedure, a more current treatment method.
Visual acuity and higher-order aberrations with wave front-guided and wave front optimized laser in situ keratomileusis. J Cataract Refract Surg.
One year results of photorefractive keratectomy and laser in situ keratomileusis for myopia using a 213nm wavelength solid-state laser.
Following those principles he developed the myopic keratomileusis (subtracting tissue) and the keratophakia (adding tissue) for hyperopia, giving birth to a new era in refractive surgery: the lamellar refractive surgery.
Since about 1990, though, refractive surgeons have used laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) to reshape the cornea and produce monovision surgically, with excellent results.
Anupam Chatterjee, an ophthalmic surgeon at the Ultralase clinic in Chester, was alleged to have carried out `'laser in situ keratomileusis', a type of operation known as LASIK, on both the patient's eyes on the same day, against the guidance of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists.