keratomileusis


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Related to keratomileusis: LASIK, keratophakia, epikeratoplasty

keratomileusis

 [ker″ah-to-mĭ-loo´sis]
keratoplasty in which a slice of the patient's cornea is removed, shaped to the desired curvature, and then sutured back on the remaining cornea to correct optical error.
laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK) keratoplasty in which the excimer laser and microkeratome are combined for vision correction; the microkeratome is used to shave a thin slice and create a hinged flap in the cornea, the flap is reflected back, the exposed cornea is reshaped by the laser, and the flap is replaced, without sutures, to heal back into position.

ker·a·to·mi·leu·sis

(ker'ă-tō-mī-lū'sis),
Surgical alteration of refractive error by changing the shape of a deep layer of the cornea: the anterior lamella is peeled back, frozen, and recarved on its back surface on a lathe; some of the corneal stroma can be removed from the bed with a laser or a knife.
[coinage, prob. fr. G. keras (kerat-), horn, cornea, + smileusis, carving]

keratomileusis

/ker·a·to·mi·leu·sis/ (ker″ah-to-mĭ-loo´sis) keratoplasty in which a slice of the patient's cornea is removed, shaped to the desired curvature, and then sutured back on the remaining cornea to correct optical error.
laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis  (LASIK) keratoplasty in which the excimer laser and microkeratome are combined for vision correction; the microkeratome is used to shave a thin slice and create a hinged flap in the cornea, the exposed cornea is reshaped by the laser, and the flap is replaced, without sutures, to heal back into position.
Enlarge picture
Laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis for treatment of myopia. (A), Creation of flap; (B), Laser ablation of the stromal bed, showing the area of tissue removal in blue; (C), flap replaced, with the central cornea flattened

keratomileusis

(kĕr′ə-tō-mə-lo͞o′sĭs)
n.
Eye surgery in which refractive disorders are corrected by reshaping an inner layer of the cornea, formerly performed by freezing corneal layers and forming them to a new curvature, but now usually performed using a laser.

ker·a·to·mi·leu·sis

(ker'ă-tō-mī-lū'sis)
Surgical alteration of refractive error by changing the shape of a deep layer of the cornea.
[coinage, prob. fr. G. keras (kerat-), horn, cornea, + smileusis, carving]

keratomileusis

A surgical procedure on the cornea aimed at correcting ametropia. An anterior layer of the cornea is sliced off with a microkeratome, frozen, ground to a new curvature and sutured back in the same location. There are many complications and technical difficulties associated with this procedure. Syn. refractive keratoplasty and keratorefractive surgery (both terms also include epikeratoplasty, keratophakia and radial keratotomy). See epikeratoplasty; Intacs; photorefractive keratectomy; keratome; keratophakia; LASEK; LASIK.
References in periodicals archive ?
Comparison of the changes in corneal biomechanical properties after photorefractive keratectomy and laser in situ keratomileusis.
Ocular higher-order aberration and contrast sensitivity after conventinal laser in situ keratomileusis.
Measurement of corneal curvature change after mechanical laser in situ keratomileusis flap creation and femtosecond laser flap creation.
A modification of PRK, laser subepithelial keratomileusis (LASEK), was introduced in 1999 to eliminate the disadvantages of PRK.
If you have very thin corneas, you may need a refractive procedure such as photorefractive keratectomy (FRK) or laser epithelial keratomileusis (LASEK) instead of LASIK.
Late traumatic dislocation of laser in situ keratomileusis corneal flaps.
Following those principles he developed the myopic keratomileusis (subtracting tissue) and the keratophakia (adding tissue) for hyperopia, giving birth to a new era in refractive surgery: the lamellar refractive surgery.
three factors determine whether or not a person is a good candidate for laser in situ keratomileusis, or whether another option should be taken, such as photorefractive keratectomy (similar to Lasik, in that the shape of the cornea is changed by laser, but different in that the top corneal layer is removed, rather than moved out of the way by making a flap that is repositioned after surgery).
Laser-assisted in Most commonly Nearsighted Situ Keratomileusis performed laser people (LASIK) eye surgery.