keloid

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keloid

 [ke´loid]
a sharply elevated, irregularly shaped, progressively enlarging scar, due to excessive collagen formation in the corium during connective tissue repair. It is a benign tumor that usually has its origin in a scar from surgery or a burn or other injury; keloids are generally considered harmless and noncancerous, although they may produce contractures or cosmetic alterations that affect body image. Ordinarily they cause no trouble beyond an occasional itching sensation. Surgical removal is not usually effective because it results in a high rate of recurrence. However, intralesional injection of steroids, cryotherapy, and x-ray therapy often are of substantial help. When x-ray therapy is employed, care must be taken not to destroy the surrounding healthy tissue. adj., adj keloid´al.
Keloid. From Dorland's, 2000.

ke·loid

(kē'loyd),
A nodular, firm, movable, nonencapsulated, often linear mass of hyperplastic scar tissue, tender and frequently painful, consisting of wide irregularly distributed bands of collagen; occurs in the dermis and adjacent subcutaneous tissue, usually after trauma, surgery, a burn, or severe cutaneous disease such as cystic acne, and is more common in blacks.
Synonym(s): cheloid
[G. kēlē, a tumor (or kēlis, a spot), + eidos, appearance]

keloid

also

cheloid

(kē′loid′)
n.
A red, raised formation of fibrous scar tissue caused by excessive tissue repair in response to trauma or surgical incision.

ke·loid′al (-loid′l) adj.

keloid

Hypertrophic scar Dermatology A thick, irregular and indurated skin scar of adults aged 15-45 that is 6-fold more common in dark-skinned persons and in ♀; keloids occur in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome and are associated with infections, burns, trauma, insect bites Management Local steroid injections to relieve pruritus or ↓ size of early lesions; post-excisional recurrence is common

ke·loid

(kē'loyd)
A nodular, firm, often linear mass of hyperplastic thickish scar tissue, consisting of irregularly distributed bands of collagen; occurs in the dermis, usually after trauma, surgery, a burn, or severe cutaneous disease.
[G. kēlē, a tumor (or kēlis, a spot), + eidos, appearance]

keloid

(kē′lŏyd) [Gr. kele, tumor, + eidos, form, shape]
Enlarge picture
KELOID
An exuberant scar that forms at the site of an injury (or an incision) and spreads beyond the borders of the original lesion. The scar is made up of a swirling mass of collagen fibers and fibroblasts. Grossly it appears to have a shiny surface and a rubbery consistency. The most common locations for keloid formation are on the shoulders, chest, and back. See: illustration

Treatment

The injection of a corticosteroid sometimes helps the lesion regress. Freezing the tissue with liquid nitrogen, applying pressure dressings, treating it with lasers, excising it surgically, or a combination of these treatments may be used, but recurrences are frequent.

acne keloid

A keloid that develops at the site of an acne pustule.
illustration

keloid

An abnormal healing response causing scars that are markedly overgrown, thickened and disfiguring. Keloids are commoner in black people than in white and may follow any injury or surgical incision. Surgical removal of keloids is followed by even more extensive keloid formation but they can be helped by injection of corticosteroid drugs. Untreated keloids eventually flatten.

Keloid

An unusual or abnormal growth of scar tissue, as in the third stage of granuloma inguinale.
Mentioned in: Granuloma Inguinale

ke·loid

(kē'loyd)
A nodular, firm, often linear mass of hyperplastic thickish scar tissue, consisting of irregularly distributed bands of collagen; occurs in the dermis.
[G. kēlē, a tumor (or kēlis, a spot), + eidos, appearance]
References in periodicals archive ?
(1,3) Intralesional steroid injections (triamcinolone acetonide 2.5-5 mg/cc) with 0.1 cc injected into each lesion every 2 to 3 weeks for 3 to 6 injections can reduce inflammation and pruritus and reduce the thickness of keloidal scars.
However, MIKAELIAN & GROSS (2002) use the term fibroma or keloidal fibrossarcoma for cutaneous nodules or plaques in dogs, which, histologically, are focal dermal and/or subcutaneous depositions of thickened and hyalinized collagen fibers mixing with fibroblasts.
Topics ranged from findings on how African hairstyling habits affect the hair to progress in treating keloidal acne (acne associated with subcutaneous hair growth).
She reviewed some of the recent papers about ethnic differences in skin physiology, diseases and treatment as well as conditions such as contact dermatitis, pigment disorders, pseudofolliculitis barbae, keloidal scarring and melanoma.
These may include ice-pick type scars, hypertrophic scars, atrophic macules, or keloidal scars.
In preclinical studies, Immusol has shown that VIT100 inhibits the growth of cells taken from multiple keloid biopsies as compared to the same keloidal cells treated with a control.
The erstwhile slave Sethe, wounded emotionally and physically while she was a slave, has keloidal marks on her back to arrest the reader.
Patients with mild (less than 26) atrophic icepick acne scars and those with keloidal tendency were not included.
Pedunculated lesions are quite amenable to surgery They are often mushroom shaped, with a narrow base that doesn't contain keloidal tissue.
Initial injection of TA to the keloidal tissue is very laborious due to its firm consistency.
Pregnant females and one-year postdelivery or lactating females and females on oral contraceptive pills or patients with preexisting inflammatory dermatoses such as psoriasis and atopic dermatitis, or with history infection or with keloidal tendency were excluded from the study.
The mesenchymal nature of this tumor provides the groundwork for different histologic variants (clear cell, spindle cell, granular cell, pigmented, keloidal, sclerosing, myxoid, pseudoangiomatous, and variants with osteoclast-giant cell, osteoid, or chondroid formation), making it harder for the pathologist to reach a diagnosis based on histology.