kosher

(redirected from keeping kosher)
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Ethnic nutrition Referring to foods prepared in accordance with Jewish dietary law
Vox populi Kosher entered mainstream English in the mid-1920s, as a synonym for correct, genuine, or legitimate
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

ko·sher

(kō'shĕr)
Denotes a diet that follows the dietary laws required in observant Jews; it interdicts consumption of some food altogether and requires that dairy and meat items be consumed at different times and on different dishes. Kosher butchers prepare meats and poultry according to hygiene precepts more stringent than those observed by nonkosher butchers.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

kosher

A rabbinic term derived from the Hebrew word for proper or fit and most commonly applied to the food authorized for orthodox Jews. Kosher foods include the meat of cattle, sheep, goats, chickens and fish with scales and fins. Animals must be killed in accordance with prescribed rules and carcasses inspected for disease. Meat must be immediately broiled or salted. Such observances are of significant hygienic value.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Keeping kosher is more than not eating pig; it is not being one as well.
For them, keeping kosher is decidedly, and somewhat ironically, un-American.
And third, because all three meals were procured using the popular food-ordering application Seamless, a service that I once dearly loved but am now determined, in an odd 21st-century take on keeping kosher, never to use again.
As I connected more with my Jewish roots and began keeping kosher, I eventually had to contend with the week of Passover eating.
Still I was struck by her story and her commitment; it resembled the diligence with which Jews that I know approach keeping kosher. When you're out in the world, your choices are limited.
To help order this chaotically tasty universe, Israel's master bakers have long obeyed an unwritten code: burekas filled with cheese were triangle-shaped, helping those keeping kosher separate the milk and the meat.
* The Hebrew National kerfuffle has yielded some thoughtful writing on the practice of keeping Kosher. [Jewcy]
As both he and his mother told me last year when I profiled him for Tablet Magazine, he grew up keeping kosher while also attending chapel and acting in the annual Christmas pageant at his private school in Richmond, Virginia.