karyotype

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karyotype

 [kar´e-o-tīp]
the chromosomal constitution of the cell nucleus; by extension, the photomicrograph of chromosomes arranged. See also illustration at chromosome.
Preparation of a karyotype. From Mueller and Young, 2001.

kar·y·o·type

(kar'ē-ō-tīp),
The chromosome characteristics of an individual cell or of a cell line arranged in descending order of size and according to the position of the centromere. Usually presented as a systematized array of metaphase chromosomes from a photomicrograph of a single cell nucleus.
Synonym(s): idiogram (1) , karyogram
[karyo- + G. typos, model]

karyotype

(kăr′ē-ə-tīp′)
n.
1. The characterization of the chromosomal complement of an individual or a species, including number, form, and size of the chromosomes.
2. A photomicrograph of chromosomes arranged according to a standard classification.
tr.v. karyo·typed, karyo·typing, karyo·types
To classify and array (the chromosome complement of an organism or a species) according to the arrangement, number, size, shape, or other characteristics of the chromosomes.

kar′y·o·typ′ic (-tĭp′ĭk), kar′y·o·typ′i·cal adj.

kar·y·o·type

(kar'ē-ō-tīp)
The chromosome characteristics of an individual cell or of a cell line, usually presented as a systematized array of metaphase chromosomes from a photomicrograph of a single cell nucleus arranged in pairs in descending order of size and according to the position of the centromere.
Synonym(s): idiogram (1) .
[karyo- + G. typos, model]

karyotype

1. The individual chromosomal complement of a person or species. The genome.
2. The CHROMOSOMES of an individual set out in a standard pattern and obtained from a photomicrograph taken in METAPHASE that has been edited with software so that the separate chromosomes are arranged in numerical order. This is done for the diagnosis of chromosomal disorders, as in prenatal detection of fetal abnormality.

karyotype

the CHROMOSOME complement of a cell or organism, characterized by the number, size and configuration of the chromosomes as seen during metaphase of MITOSIS.

Karyotype

A standard arrangement of photographic or computer-generated images of chromosome pairs from a cell in ascending numerical order, from largest to smallest.

kar·y·o·type

(kar'ē-ō-tīp)
The chromosome characteristics of an individual cell or of a cell line, usually presented as a systematized array of metaphase chromosomes from a photomicrograph of a single cell nucleus arranged in pairs in descending order of size and according to the position of the centromere.
Synonym(s): idiogram (1) .
[karyo- + G. typos, model]
References in periodicals archive ?
Robertsonian rearrangements followed by pericentric inversions were proposed as the primary mechanisms involved in the karyotypic evolution of these rodents [7].
2003: Karyotypic characteristics of Spalax microphthalmus in the central Caucasus.
Aberrant increase in the immature platelet fraction in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: a marker of karyotypic abnormalities associated with poor prognosis.
The cytochemical (Sudan Black and periodic acid Schiff), immunophenotypic, karyotypic, and molecular features (if available) were also reviewed.
Supernumerary ring marker chromosome as a secondary rearrangement in a parapharyngeal lipoma with (10; 12) (q25; q15) as the primary karyotypic abnormality.
Additionally, cancer displays heteroploidy, meaning that there are multiple different karyotypic clones present in any given cancer.
Of the studied accessions, 11 presented the karyotypic formula 11M + 1SM (Figure 2), in which chromosome 12 was classified as submetacentric.
Although cytogenetic abnormalities of MSCs in MDS have been observed in some previous studies (18-22), it is still necessary to further investigate the karyotypic features of Chinese MDS patients, because there are population differences in genetic makeup, especially between Asian and Western peoples (5,22).
Karyotypic studies of Carthamus species has been very limited as it is difficult to resolve the somatic chromosomes because of the poor stain ability, stickiness of chromosome, tendency of chromosome to overlap at metaphase and diffused appearance of primary and secondary constriction [4].
In the rapidly changing field of neoplastic hematology, patient management more and more relies on morphologic, immunophenotypic, karyotypic, and genetic characteristics.
Another remarkable character of mole rats is their exceptionally extensive karyotypic variation which has been recorded between populations.
Ninety-nine patients had normal karyotype; 31 patients had Ph+ ALL as defined by conventional cytogenetics, FISH, or PCR; 15 patients had other unfavorable abnormalities (-7, +8, 11q23/MLL gene rearrangement); and 15 patients had other karyotypic abnormalities.