karyolysis


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Related to karyolysis: necrosis, karyorrhexis

karyolysis

 [kar″e-ol´ĭ-sis]
the dissolution of the nucleus of a cell. adj., adj karyolyt´ic.

kar·y·ol·y·sis

(kar'ē-ol'i-sis), Avoid the misspelling/mispronunciation karolysis and the mispronunciation karyoly'sis.
Destruction of the nucleus of a cell by swelling and loss of affinity of its chromatin for basic dyes.
[karyo- + G. lysis, dissolution]

kar·y·ol·y·sis

(kar'ē-ol'i-sis)
Destruction of the nucleus of a cell by swelling, with the loss of affinity of its chromatin for basic dyes.
[karyo- + G. lysis, dissolution]

karyolysis

Destruction of a cell nucleus.
References in periodicals archive ?
On examination of the Hematoxylin and Eosin stained sections of the diabetic group, it revealed myocardial disarray accompanied with loss of the normal striated architecture of the cardiomyocytes with presence of characteristic degenerative changes of the nuclei in the form of pyknosis, karyorrhexis, and karyolysis. These results coincide with the results of Schneider et al.
In treated rats with platinum azidothymidine, there were many regions with karyolysis and pyknosis that were signs of apoptosis and also some regions showed necrosis.
ONL nuclear deformations (arrows) were observed in (A) control ONL nucleus and as (B) nucleolus condensation, (C) karyolysis, (D, E pyknosis, and (F) karyorrhexis.
Necrosis of the epithelium of proximal convoluted tubules was characterized by pyknosis, karyorhexis and karyolysis. Vacuolation of cytoplasm of tubular epithelium was present.
Similarly, necrotic cell death has been reported accompanied by irreversible changes in the nucleus, such as karyolysis, pyknosis and karyorrhexis (21) as well as the loss of structure and fragmentation of the cytoplasm, similar to what is observed at high magnification (Figure 2A3c) when compared with the nonischemic control (Figure 2A1a).
The histologic hallmarks of necrosis are usually considered to be the regional involvement of multiple contiguous cells, hypereosinophilia and swelling of the cytoplasm, variable nuclear changes including pyknosis, karyolysis, or karyorrhexis, and an accompanying inflammatory reaction because of the rupture of cell membranes with the release of cell contents.
Histopathological examination using H&E stained sections of liver samples of control group showed normal hepatic architecture, whereas examination of liver sections of animals treated with EE & CPZ showed numerous apoptotic figures, pyknosis and karyolysis associated with mononuclear cellular infiltration and green to yellowish brown areas of intracellular bile pigments (Figure 1(b)).
Ishikawa et al (34) based their morphologic assessment of viability on the description in the 2nd edition of Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease, which is similar to the description in the 7th edition: Necrotic (irreversibly injured) cells show increased eosinophilia (acidophilic cytoplasm) and 1 of 3 patterns of nuclear changes--pyknosis, karyorrhexis, or karyolysis. (38) According to the grading scheme proposed by Evans et al, (24) viable pancreatic cancer cells can show cytoplasmic or nuclear swelling, multiple nuclei, and cytoplasmic vacuolization, whereas nonviable cancer cells have bizarre, hyperchromatic, pyknotic nuclei usually with swollen, vacuolated, or deeply eosinophilic cytoplasm and exhibit karyorrhexis.
This degeneration continued through to the end of the anoxia exposure (60 h), leading to pyknotic nuclei, karyorrhexis, karyolysis, and increased eosinophilia of the cytoplasm, with loss of distinct cell borders consistent with coagulative necrosis.