karst

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Related to karstification: karstic

karst

limestone topography typified by potholes, caverns and underground streams.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Examples of the two stage process of ghost rock karstification have been reported from across Europe.
Galve et al., "Evaluation of geochemical and hydrogeological processes by geochemical modeling in an area affected by evaporite karstification," Journal of Hydrology, vol.
The karstification process varies depending on the structure of the soluble rock in the cave and the characteristics of the rainwater inflows, depending on the climatic conditions.
This concept allows for vertically directed recharge down-dip into basin-scale flow systems, a wide range of FGWZ--stream interaction, and karstification of adjacent evaporite strata (Baechler and Boehner 2014).
These rocks, which are dipping towards the main stream by about 515 degrees, are characterized by extensive fracturing and karstification, which contribute to forming cavities, voids, and underground karstic conduits.
Karst morphology features cover more than half (54%) of Croatia, or over 70% if one takes into account the Croatian Adriatic submarine environment where carbonate rock formations that undergo karstification are predominant (Garasic et al.
A process known as karstification has to date created about 3000 circular collapses forming small basins filled with groundwater.
Away from the main linear tectonic zones, karst is rarely developed at the Ahtme and Estonia mines, observed over less than 1% of the mine area; in the Tammiku, Viru and Sompa mines, karst is present over 2-4% of the respective areas, while in the Kivioli, Kohtla and Kava 2 and 4 deposits, karstification is practically absent.
(1986) Preliminary study on karstification and hydro-thermal metallogenesis of the Jiepaiyu realgar deposit, Hunan province.
Leaching, karstification, and other processes that took place in the pre-Devonian continental period or during the Devonian might have altered the corresponding rocks in some places, possibly under subareal or near-surface conditions.
To quantitate surface karstification we have devised a "karst index", a measure of the density of hachured (closed) contour lines within a given area.