kapha


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kapha

/ka·pha/ (kah´fah) [Sanskrit] in ayurveda, one of the three doshas, condensed from the elements water and earth. It is the principle of stabilizing energy, governs growth in the body and mind, is concerned with structure, stability, lubrication, and fluid balance, and is eliminated from the body through the urine.

kapha

Ayurvedic medicine
The dosha that represents the earth and water forces according to the ayurvedic construct of the universe; kapha is the densest of the elements, and is related to organic tissues, fluids and other substances. Kapha energy heals and imparts physical strength and resiliency; it flows at its peak in the winter and early spring.

kapha

(kaf'a, kap'a) [Sanskrit, kapha, mucus, phlegm]
In ayurvedic medicine, the dosha responsible for the structure of the body.
See: dosha

kapha (käˑ·f),

n in Ayurveda, one of the three organizing principles (doshas) that are responsible for maintaining homeostasis. Formed by a combination of water and earth, kapha is responsible for body stability and cohesion. See also doshas.
kapha, avalambaka (·v·lmˑ·b·k),
n in Ayurveda, a subdivision of the kapha dosha whose influence is evident in the upper torso, heart, and lungs. It promotes upper body strength and cardiac health; when imbalanced, back pain, heart, or respiratory diseases may result. See also doshas.
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Kapha, avalambaka.
kapha, bodhaka (bōˑ·dh·k),
n in Ayurveda, a subdivision of the kapha dosha whose influence is evident in the tongue and throat. It promotes mucus secretion and the sense of taste; imbalance may result in dry mouth, indigestion, and a loss of gustation. See also doshas.
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Kapha, bodhaka.
kapha, kledaka (klāˑ·d·k),
n in Ayurveda, a subdivision of the kapha dosha whose influence is evident in the stomach. It promotes the initial stages of food digestion; when imbalanced, digestive disorders may result. See also doshas.
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Kapha, kledaka.
kapha, sama (sä·m kä·f),
n in Ayurveda, ama in combination with a kapha imbalance, manifesting in the form of severe mucilaginous conditions. Remedied with pungent and bitter herbs. See also ama and kapha.
kapha, shleshaka (shlāˑ·shä·k),
n in Ayurveda, a subdivision of the kapha dosha whose influence is evident in the joints. It promotes lubrication of the joints and maintenance of connective tissues; imbalance may result in joint diseases such as arthritis. See also doshas.
kapha, tarpaka (tr·p·k),
n in Ayurveda, a subdivision of the kapha dosha, the influence of which is evident in the head, sinuses, and cerebrospinal fluid. It promotes healthy moisture levels in the eyes, nose, and throat and also contributes to maintenance of the CSF. Imbalance may result in sinus problems, respiratory illnesses, and loss of olfaction. See also doshas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Kapha provides the structures and the lubrication that the body needs.
The plasma of right hemispheric dominant kapha group showed a significant increase in the above mentioned parameters as compared to bihemispheric dominant vata group.
For instance, people of Kapha nature have skin which is naturally oily, soft, and supple.
The knowledge gained from the pulse reading then helps to categorise a client into one of the three body types, namely Vata, Pita and Kapha.
People with Kapha natures tend to have a heavier frame, think and move in a more leisurely way, and are stable.
vata, pitta and kapha, which is central to Ayurveda, is an example for this.
Kapha Made up of earth and water Kapha people normally have a heavier body type and are stable characters who dislike too much activity or change.
For example, the Middle East region is considered Pitta, 6-10am are the Kapha hours, windy weather is Vata, etc.
Vata governs bodily functions concerning movement; pitta governs heat, metabolism and energy production; and kapha governs fluid balance and physical structure, such as fat, tissue and muscle.
Brief descriptions of breathing techniques such as anuloma viloma (HYP 2:7-10), kapalabhati (HYP 2:35), and the eight kumbhakas including bhastrika and surya bhedana (HYP 2:44) also are enumerated in the literature alongside the curative efficacy of each practice including the removal of disease and humoral disorders such as excessive kapha (phlegm), pitta (bile), and vayu (air or wind), appeasing hunger, thirst, sleep, and fever, overcoming disease, and the purification of the seventy-two thousand nadis.
If I'd been larger of build, with oily skin, a deep sleeper, keen on water sports and satisfied with life then I'd have been a kapha.
Using the art of Ayurveda, an ancient healing system based on a person's "dosha," or energy, the paint colors are divided into three palettes based on three ancient constitutions: Kapha, Vata and Pitta.