kaolin

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Related to kaolinite: Illite, Montmorillonite

kaolin

 [ka´o-lin]
native hydrated aluminum silicate, powdered and freed from gritty particles by elutriation; used as an adsorbent and, often with pectin, an antidiarrheal.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

ka·o·lin

(kā'ō-lin),
Hydrated aluminum silicate; when powdered and freed from gritty particles by elution, kaolin is used as a demulcent and adsorbent. In dentistry, used to add toughness and opacity to porcelain teeth.
Synonym(s): aluminum silicate
[Ch. kao lin, High Ridge, name of a locality in China where the substance is found in abundance]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

kaolin

also

kaoline

(kā′ə-lĭn)
n.
A fine clay used in ceramics and refractories, as a filler or coating for paper and textiles, as an additive in food and toothpaste, and as an antidiarrheal drug.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

kaolin

A fine clay powder used as a suspension in the treatment of DIARRHOEA and sometimes as a thick paste POULTICE to apply local heat. The term is derived from the name of the Chinese province where it was first obtained.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

ka·o·lin

(kā'ō-lin)
Hydrated aluminum silicate; when powdered and freed from gritty particles by elution, used as a demulcent and adsorbent. In dentistry, used to add toughness and opacity to porcelain teeth.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
In general, the film SG-k was the only sample that presented significant differences in the X-ray diffractogram pattern, in comparison to the SG film (Figure 2a), where characteristic reflections of the (001) and (002) planes of the kaolinite clay are verified [22, 23].
The small number of exchangeable cations present at the edges of sheets of the kaolinite structure does not allow the clay to swell (Foster 1954).
The domination of the kaolinite type in the study area resulted in significant relation to saturated CEC, cation bases, and base in the profiles.
Montmorillonite clay has the most dramatic swelling capacity; therefore, the reaction with the clay waste was somewhat different from kaolinite clay in terms of their rigidity under cyclic loading.
Clay minerals have been used as solid matrices to enhance the stability of bixin, but no systematic study has described the mechanism of bixin adsorption onto kaolinite. Rapid and efficient dye adsorption is important for industrial applications.
Kaolinite is featured by two spectral doublets: one is near 1400 nm (1390 and 1410 nm), and the other is near 2200 nm (2160 and 2210 nm).
It contains 39.3% clay, which included illite (84.9%), illite/smectite (2.2%), kaolinite (10.3%), and chlorite (2.6%).
As seen in Figure 8, the volumes of most primary minerals (except quartz and kaolinite) decreased due to dissolution.
Previous literature has concluded that the [[tau].sub.df] of mudded intercalations with kaolinite is higher than that for illite [17-19].
The first material, called 'kaolin', contains mainly kaolinite ([d.sub.001] = 0.7 nm, d is the interlayer spacing) and, at a smaller percentage, illite ([d.sub.001] = 1 nm) and quartz ([d.sub.001] =0.34nm).
The XRF and XRD results also show that several high-density minerals such as quartz, kaolinite, and pyrite are enriched in the heavy product.
The quantitative analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) of Bijoypur clay before and after acid treatment showed that it is a mixture mainly of kaolinite ([Al.sub.2][O.sub.3]-2Si[O.sub.2] x 2[H.sub.2]O) and illite; however, the major phase is kaolinite.