juvenile offender


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juvenile offender

ju·ve·nile of·fend·er

(jū'vĕ-nil ŏ-fend'ĕr)
In law, a person who has yet to reach legal majority but who has broken a law.
References in periodicals archive ?
The univariate and bivariate results just described are used in the following to inform a multivariate statistical model that identifies factors that influence the probability of a juvenile offender being processed by each of the three processing track alternatives.
In addition, juveniles with foster care experience and other negative home environments are significantly more likely to engage in delinquent activities earlier than are juvenile offenders without such backgrounds (Alitucker, Bullis, Close, & Yovanoff, 2006; Caldwell, Beutler, Sturges, & Silver, 2006; Leve & Chamberlain, 2004).
The question that prosecutors, judges, and juries must wrestle with is how to punish juvenile offenders.
The adult and juvenile offenders take turns sharing their life stories.
Juvenile offenders who target peers or adults more often commit sexual assault in conjunction with another crime (e.
Wisconsin pioneered a progressive, community-based program called the "Balanced Approach," which combines the principles of protecting the community, teaching juvenile offenders to be accountable for their crimes, and helping them develop skills.
LOS ANGELES, May 7, 2014 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Los Angeles (spcaLA) and the Los Angeles County District Attorney's Office shared the cure for violence on a national platform: spcaLA's Teaching Love and Compassion Program for Juvenile Offenders (jTLC)(TM).
Vedder, Juvenile Offenders (Springfield: Illinois Press, 1979).
In a two-day, court-mandated course - a condition of probation for some juvenile offenders -teens are paired with shelter dogs and offered intensive sessions designed to help at-risk youth identify and break the cycle of violence.
Juvenile offenders, in general, seldom seek preventive care or maintain routine medical visits.
The studies used statistical controls for criminal history and other factors that influence decisions to transfer juvenile offenders to the adult system.
law, a juvenile offender or juvenile delinquent is someone under age 18 who commits an act that would qualify as a crime if committed by anyone 18 or older.

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