juvenile myoclonic epilepsy


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ju·ve·nile my·o·clon·ic ep·i·lep·sy

[MIM*606904]
an epilepsy syndrome typically beginning in early adolescence, and characterized by early morning myoclonic jerks that may progress into a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. A genetic disorder: some families have had gene linkage to chromosome-6. The EEG is characterized by generalized polyspike and wave discharges at 4-6 Hz.

juvenile myoclonic epilepsy

Neurology A seizure disorder that comprises ± 4% of seizure disorders Clinical Normal IQ, onset in adolescence, affecting the flexor muscles of the head, neck and shoulders; the attacks tend to occur as clonic-tonic-clonic seizures upon awakening EEG 4-6 Hz multispike and wave pattern; 40% of relatives, especially ♀, have myoclonus Management Valproic acid. See Epilepsy.

ju·ve·nile my·o·clon·ic ep·i·lep·sy

(jū'vĕ-nil mī'ō-klon'ik ep'i-lep'sē)
An inherited epilepsy syndrome typically beginning in early adolescence, and characterized by early morning myoclonic jerks that may progress into a generalized tonic-clonic seizure.

juvenile myoclonic epilepsy

A form of epilepsy typically noticed in teenagers, characterized by early morning jerking movements of the extremities, and during stress or sleep deprivation, generalized tonic/clonic or absence seizures.
Synonym: Janz syndrome.
See also: epilepsy
References in periodicals archive ?
Guidotti et al., "Thalamofrontal circuitry and executive dysfunction in recent-onset juvenile myoclonic epilepsy," Epilepsia, vol.
Somatosensory evoked potentials in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. Epilepsia 1992; 33:527-530.
About 10% of children with epilepsy never remit, including patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, reading epilepsy, myoclonic absence epilepsy, and early myoclonic encephalopathy.
"Sometimes the jerks only last for a split second, and on this occasion I was so intensely into playing that I just carried on." Axel was diagnosed with primary juvenile myoclonic epilepsy when he was 16.
Absences occur not only in Childhood Absence Epilepsy were it is the only seizure type of the syndrome, but occur in other types of of idiopathic not localisaton related epilepsy syndromes, like Juvenile Absence Epilepsy (JAE), Juvenile Myoclonic epilepsy (JME) and Eyelid Myoclonia with Absences (Jeavons syndrome).
One of the most common epileptic syndromes is Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy or JME.
The majority of participants had juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), although the study also included patients with juvenile absence epilepsy or tonic-clonic seizures upon awakening.
In 1957 Janz and Christian were the first to observe that patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME), a type of primary generalized epilepsy, were more likely to fall asleep later and get up later than their peers and suffer from prolonged morning drowsiness and are most active in the afternoon and evening time [8].
Interictal mood and personality disorders in temporal lobe epilepsy and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1996; 61:601-605.
* Epileptic myoclonus including juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, progressive myoclonic epilepsies (PME), epilepsia partialis continua, Rasmussen's encephalitis, early infantile myoclonic encephalopathy, infantile spasms (also known as West syndrome), Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, benign familial myoclonic epilepsy, and Angelman syndrome; and

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