juvenile


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juvenile

 [ju´vĕ-nīl]
1. pertaining to youth or childhood; young or immature.
2. a youth or child; a young animal; a cell or organism intermediate between the immature and mature forms.

juvenile

/ju·ve·nile/ (ju´vin-īl)
1. pertaining to youth or childhood.
2. a youth or child; a young animal.
3. a cell or organism intermediate between immature and mature forms.

juvenile

(jo͞o′və-nīl′, -nəl)
adj.
a. Not fully grown or developed; young.
b. Of or characteristic of a young animal that has not reached sexual maturity: a bird still in juvenile plumage.
n.
a. A young person; a child.
b. A young animal that has not reached sexual maturity.
c. A two-year-old racehorse.

ju′ve·nile′ly adv.
ju′ve·nile′ness n.

juvenile

[jo̅o̅′vənəl, -vənīl]
Etymology: L, juvenus, youthful
1 n, a young person; a youth; a child; a youngster.
2 adj, pertaining to, characteristic of, or suitable for a young person; youthful.
3 adj, physiologically underdeveloped or immature.
4 adj, denoting psychological or intellectual immaturity; childish.

juvenile

adjective Between an infant and an adult

juvenile

1. pertaining to young animals; young or immature.
2. a cell, tissue, disease or organism intermediate between the immature and mature forms.

juvenile aponeurotic fibroma
see multilobular chondroma and osteoma.
juvenile bovine leukosis
see bovine viral leukosis.
juvenile cellulitis
see juvenile pyoderma.
juvenile hormone
juvenile hormone insect growth hormone; regulates larval development and metamorphosis. It acts to maintain the larval stage and retard maturation to the adult stage. See also insect growth regulators.
juvenile osteoporosis
see osteogenesis imperfecta.
juvenile pancreatic atrophy
see pancreatic acinar atrophy.
juvenile sterile granulomatous dermatitis and lymphadenitis
see juvenile pyoderma.

Patient discussion about juvenile

Q. Can someone please explain the reason for juvenile delinquency?

A. Juvenile delinquency is not necessarily a trait of bipolar disorder, although it is possible for a person with bipolar disorder to act on impulse while experiencing an episode. To use Justins example, shop lifting, an adult in a manic episode may spend all of their money without thought or reason, where a child/youth may not have money to spend which may lead to shop lifting. In a manic episode Justin is right the lines between right and wrong can be blurred, thus the person suffering may make poor decisions and can find themselves in trouble with the law.

More discussions about juvenile
References in periodicals archive ?
A juvenile shall be informed about his rights available under the law by a legal practitioner within twenty four hours of taking him into custody.
No person shall be appointed as a Judge of a Juvenile Court unless he is or has been a session judge or an additional session judge, or a Judicial Magistrate vested with powers under section 30 of the code or a practicing advocate who has at least ten years standing at Bar, and the latter shall be appointed on such terms and conditions as the Government may determine in consultation with the concerned High Court.
In a way, this order has provided crime-job facilities to juvenile.
They strike a balance by calibrating the age below which a person is considered juvenile to the nature of the crime.
Subsequent to adjudication, assessment and disposition, juvenile sex offenders are placed in one of the aforementioned programs based on their level of risk to sexually reoffend, with juveniles who are deemed high-risk placed in secure-care facilities.
What matters for the present discussion is that engaging parents in a meaningful way in the juvenile justice process helps build positive views of the law within the family and potentially diminishes delinquent behavior.
The National Center for Juvenile Justice (NCJJ) used these three general regimes as the basis for a widely used typology of blended sentencing practices in the states (Torbet, Gable, Hurst, Montgomery, Szymanski, and Thomas, 1996), summarized in Table 1.
Tanenhaus makes two important arguments about the history of the juvenile court.
Florida is among the states with the most juvenile offenders--about 600--serving life sentences, about 270 without parole.
While chapters one and two set the tone for the book and give background on American sex offending, Chapters 3-4 give a much needed injection of critical scrutiny to the current discourse about legal responses to juvenile sexual offending.
Although rehabilitation may not be the exclusive focus of the juvenile justice system today, public opinion still supports this goal.