juvenile


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juvenile

 [ju´vĕ-nīl]
1. pertaining to youth or childhood; young or immature.
2. a youth or child; a young animal; a cell or organism intermediate between the immature and mature forms.

juvenile

(jo͞o′və-nīl′, -nəl)
adj.
a. Not fully grown or developed; young.
b. Of or characteristic of a young animal that has not reached sexual maturity: a bird still in juvenile plumage.
n.
a. A young person; a child.
b. A young animal that has not reached sexual maturity.
c. A two-year-old racehorse.

ju′ve·nile′ly adv.
ju′ve·nile′ness n.

juvenile

adjective Between an infant and an adult

Patient discussion about juvenile

Q. Can someone please explain the reason for juvenile delinquency?

A. Juvenile delinquency is not necessarily a trait of bipolar disorder, although it is possible for a person with bipolar disorder to act on impulse while experiencing an episode. To use Justins example, shop lifting, an adult in a manic episode may spend all of their money without thought or reason, where a child/youth may not have money to spend which may lead to shop lifting. In a manic episode Justin is right the lines between right and wrong can be blurred, thus the person suffering may make poor decisions and can find themselves in trouble with the law.

More discussions about juvenile
References in periodicals archive ?
The law assigns different functions to the JJC including: disposal of cases through diversion upon referral from the police, prosecution or the juvenile court within a period of one month from the date of the referral; and, inspect observation homes and Juvenile Rehabilitation Centres (JRCs) and may give directions to the officer-in-charge of such places for the measures to be taken for the welfare and social re-integration of the juvenile kept under their supervision.
3) Juvenile Convicted Prisoners are those whose trials have been concluded by the trial courts and they have been found guilty of committing an offence and a sentence has been awarded to them.
The scarcity of juvenile prisons means most juveniles are detained in prisons meant for adults.
Juvenile offenders are maltreated and sexually abused in prisons, because of no proper monitoring of juvenile cells and not establishing separate jails for juveniles.
ACA also offers the following courses developed specifically for juvenile justice staff.
The Juvenile Justice Committee shall consist of four members including one serving Judicial Magistrate with powers under section 30 of the Code, who shall also head the Committee, one District Public Prosecutor, one member of local Bar having at least seven years standing at the Bar, appointed by the concerned Sessions Judge for period of two years and one serving Probation Officer or Social Welfare Officer not below the rank of BPS-17.
Figures showed that 506 juveniles committed crimes in 2015, compared to 423 crimes in 2014, while the number stood at 880 in 2010 and 2011.
Juvenile review boards (7) (JRBs) are non-adversarial administrative boards established to adjudicate cases of juvenile misconduct occurring on military installations, and are an effective administrative alternative for commanders to maintain control over on-post misconduct.
This step comes in response to the juvenile centre's staff's visit to the Psychiatry Department at Rashid Hospital.
Several factors are behind the shift, experts say: a decline in juvenile crime, concerns about the costs of adult prisons, and a growing understanding that adolescents have a greater potential for rehabilitation than adults do.
To consider the full set of costs and benefits of juvenile incarceration policies, the authors point out, one must also consider the potential reduction in crime due to the incapacitation effect of incarceration as well as the deterrent effects of strict punishment on the criminal activity of other youths.