justice

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justice

 [jus´tis]
a principle of bioethics that means giving others what is due to them; it is comprised of a group of norms for the fair distribution of benefits, risks, and costs. The terms fairness, desert, and entitlement have been used by philosophers to explicate the idea of justice, while equitability and appropriateness of treatment are used in interpretations. A situation involving justice is present whenever persons are due to receive benefits or burdens because of their particular circumstances. Justice may be distributive, criminal or punitive, or rectificatory.

jus·tice

(jŭs'tis),
The ethical principle that persons who have similar circumstances and conditions should be treated alike; sometimes known as distributive justice.
[L. justitia, fr. jus, right, law]

jus·tice

(jŭs'tis)
1. An ethical principle of fairness or equity, according equal rights to all and basing rewards on merit and punishments on guilt.
2. nursing Ethical principle that individual people and groups with similar circumstances and conditions should be treated alike; fairness with equal distribution of goods and services.
See also: Nursing Interventions Classification
[L. justitia, fr. jus, right, law]

jus·tice

(jŭs'tis)
1. An ethical principle of fairness or equity, according equal rights to all and basing rewards on merit and punishments on guilt.
2. nursing ethical principle that individual people and groups with similar circumstances and conditions should be treated alike.
[L. justitia, fr. jus, right, law]
References in periodicals archive ?
If a single label captures the long-term evolution of SCC citation patterns, it would be "nationalism" (or perhaps the even more pointed "decolonization"); for every Chief Justiceship since the end of appeals to the JCPC, English citations have fallen and Canadian citations (especially but not only to the decisions of the SCC itself) have risen.
Table 1: Sources of judicial authority: SCC reserved decisions, 2000-2008 Source of citations Number Percentage Supreme Court of Canada 7,985 58.7% Canadian appeal courts 2,541 18.0% Canadian trial courts 1,479 10.9% Canadian boards & tribunals 162 1.2% TOTAL CANADIAN 12,167 88.8% England 821 6.0% United States 476 3.5% Other countries & supranational 222 1.6% TOTAL NOT-CANADIAN 1519 11.1% TOTAL 13,686 Table 2: Sources of judicial authority by chief justiceship: SCC decisions, 1949-2008 Chief Justice Years Canadian English U.S.
(110) These cases do not seem to have any centre of gravity: they are scattered across the three Chief Justiceships (four for Dickson, seven for Lamer, four for McLachlin) and across the four areas of law indicated above.
From the beginning of Dickson's Chief Justiceship to the end of December 2006, there were 432 cases with 610 separate concurrences bearing 906 judicial signatures.
Moreover, Taney's chief justiceship not only failed to produce the constitutional revolution most ardent Democrats had desired but actually, to their everlasting regret, expanded federal authority on several notable occasions.
The chief justiceship, in sum, brings with it a special seniority.
Even in years when the regular issuance of seriatim opinions might have underscored a perception that the Chief Justice was merely one member of a collegial Court, the special seniority of the chief justiceship was evident.
(74) Although, of course, his contemporaries could not have predicted all of this in February 1796, there was clearly some alarm about the prospect of a Wilson chief justiceship.
Johnson, The Chief Justiceship of John Marshall, 1801-1835.
Thanks in no small part to his superb political skills, neither this proposal nor other attempts to curb the Court's power were enacted into law during his chief justiceship.