jurisprudence

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jurisprudence

 [jo̳r″is-proo´dens]
the science of the law.
medical jurisprudence the science of the law as applied to the practice of medicine; see also forensic medicine.

jur·is·pru·dence

(jūr'is-prū'dens),
The science of law, its principles and concepts.
[L. juris prudentia, knowledge of law]

jurisprudence

The science of law. Medical jurisprudence is another term for FORENSIC MEDICINE.

jur·is·pru·dence

(jūr'is-prū'dĕns)
Legal principles and concepts.
References in periodicals archive ?
That is, in the case of its appropriation by the Three Seals Code, dhammasattha became both textually and jurisprudentially interwoven with king-made law to the point that the boundaries between them became almost indistinguishable.
Jurisprudentially, therefore, 'transsexuals certainly do not constitute a third sex' (P v S and Cornwall County Council, 1996) and the 'recognition' of transsexuals is at its heart an assimilation of the transsexual subject into the binary heteronormative order--the transsexual is forced to choose between one or the other and have done with it.
What this amounts to is the possibility that what appears to be a meaningful free speech law case might actually, on closer inspection, fail to sufficiently exhibit the jurisprudentially necessary presuppositions of a genuine free speech law case.
Had the Court reasoned only about the limits of 'commerce' from a formal or doctrinal perspective, the conclusion would have been jurisprudentially coherent.
(22.) A counter-intuitive result of Klass's argument is that contract theorists who were unselfconscious about the jurisprudential status of contract rules may have been producing better contract theory than their more jurisprudentially sophisticated colleagues, who were led astray by Hart-ian inspired view of contract as power-conferring.
And this would seem to be unquestionable on principle, since even jurisprudentially debts and other rights of action are property and there is no reason why they should be excluded from the protection of the constitutional guarantee."
When the Rehnquist Court moved jurisprudentially in a more conservative direction after the 1980s, this reluctance took a particular form.
Jurisprudentially, however, there is often an overlap--a claim that one has a right to engage in particular activity without interference may be buttressed by a claim that others are permitted to do so--and in some of the cases it is not entirely clear which claim forms the basis for a court's decision.
All of this holds for what I am calling global absolutism, but that was a more general and jurisprudentially attuned notion stemming from and articulated most in those societies with a Roman, not common law, system.
According to the late Edward Grayson, the doyen of authors on sport and the law, jurisprudentially speaking, there is no such thing as 'sports law'.