jurisdiction

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jurisdiction

As used in the UK, the place where a body is found. Formally, the jurisdiction of a coroner is founded on
• where a dead body lies within his or her district; 
• where a body otherwise within his or her district is lost or irrecoverable; or
• where a body comes to lie in his or her district by repatriation from abroad.

jurisdiction

The authority and power of courts to hear and render judgments on the parties and subject matter of a case.
References in periodicals archive ?
software, then Part III addresses the jurisdictional limitations of the
key jurisdictional elements in the FASA and the provision in the Tucker
It depends upon a highly permissive view of what counts as a jurisdictional requirement.
between jurisdictional rhetoric and jurisdictional reality we should
The final model will enable users to create structured reports instantaneously and features numerous diagrammatical display functionalities, a holistic definition of jurisdictional or country risk, uncertainty and probability measures, a fully customizable parameter weighting and the added bonus of World-Check's research intelligence.
CPAs seeking practice rights in those states must apply through NASBA, and they may need to satisfy other jurisdictional requirements besides the UAA's.
Nevertheless, although the conflict between global markets and state claims is often noted, the role of international jurisdictional law in it is often neglected.
They claim that by allowing such health plans to jump across jurisdictional boundaries, it weakens protections that states enact to protect their citizens.
The motion to dismiss had been filed to address a jurisdictional issue, relating only to the venue of the case, not the case's merits or lack of merits,'' he said.
But he is skeptical that governments will work out the jurisdictional issues.
Department of Health and Human Services filed a motion to dismiss the lawsuit on jurisdictional grounds, claiming that challenges to Medicare matters must first wend their way through its own administrative appeals process.
In his contribution to the Vanderbilt symposium, Richard Fallon defends the reigning model of Federal Courts law, an approach to jurisdictional issues that dates from the publication in 1953 of Henry Hart and Herbert Wechsler's casebook, The Federal Courts and the Federal System.