junkie

(redirected from junkies)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms.
Drug abuse A person, usually an IV narcotic abusing addict, whose existence revolves around obtaining—often through theft, prostitution or other illicit means—the next ‘fix’ of narcotics, known in some circles as ‘junk’
Vox populi The term junkie has been commandeered in the popular culture, and applied to anyone with an ‘addiction’ for a particular food or habit—e.g., fashion junkie

junkie

Popular health A popular term for a person, usually an IV narcotic abusing addict, whose life is disorganized vis-á-vis family and societal structure, whose existence revolves around obtaining–often through theft, prostitution or other illicit means of another 'fix' of narcotic. See Cold turkey, Shooting galleries.

junkie

or

junky

A slang term for a narcotic, especially heroin, addict.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Cowboy Junkies were one of the first acts to really appreciate the work of the late Texan troubadour Townes Van Zandt, with whom they were friends (and toured together).
The brand delivers pop culture parody, original series, entertainment news, and commentary, all through the lens of the fan on Screen Junkies and Screen Junkies News channels.
Many folks brook no sympathy for heroin addicts and are likely at this very moment screaming at their newspaper or computer screen that the world has gone mad if we can't call an addict a junkie.
“For Junk Junkies Storage & Recycling, the aim is to become more visible online.
O'Halloran plays the dominant junkie, but Murphy steals the movie as his submissive sidekick.
'Subsidy junkies get weaker and weaker and one day we will have to stand on our own feet.
"We are totally 100 percent satisfied," said Joey Becerra, owner of Bath Junkies in Jonesboro and Branson, Mo.
These are imaginative tales, set along "Short Street" where junkies, drunks, deadbeats and worse are neighbors live alongside decent people struggling to survive and intractibly stubborn individuals.
Just as investors can buy futures contracts on the price of pork bellies, political junkies can risk real money on political outcomes--such as, in the graph below, the 2004 Democratic nomination.
With her "French Junkies 1-11," 2002, a series of sculptures about two and a half feet high, Nicole Wermers has brought the public ashtray into the gallery as an object both useful and aesthetic.
It was a pillar of strength during the days of decline when junkies controlled Madison Square Park.
Amid the fisticuffs there's greatness, as we film junkies know.