jugular

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Related to jugulars: external jugular vein, V jugularis

jugular

 [jug´u-lar]
1. cervical (def. 1).
2. pertaining to a jugular vein.
3. a jugular vein.
jugular veins large veins that return blood to the heart from the head and neck; each side of the neck has two jugular veins, external and internal. The external jugular carries blood from the face, neck, and scalp and has two branches, posterior and anterior. The internal jugular vein receives blood from the brain, the deeper tissues of the neck and the interior of the skull. The external jugular vein empties into the subclavian vein, and the internal jugular vein joins it to form the brachiocephalic vein, which carries the blood to the superior vena cava, where it continues to the heart. If one of these veins is severed, rapid loss of blood will result and air may enter the circulatory system. In such a case, a compress should be applied to the wound with pressure. See anatomic Table of Veins in the Appendices and see color plates.
Location of the internal and external jugular veins. From Polaski and Tatro, 1996.

jug·u·lar

(jŭg'yū-lăr),
1. Relating to the throat or neck.
2. Relating to the jugular veins.
3. A jugular vein.
[L. jugulum, throat]

jugular

(jŭg′yə-lər)
adj.
Of, relating to, or located in the region of the neck or throat.
n.
1. A jugular vein.
2. The most vital part: a strategic attack aimed at the enemy's jugular.

jug·u·lar

(jŭg'yū-lăr)
1. Relating to the throat or neck.
2. Relating to the jugular veins.
3. A jugular vein.
[L. jugulum, throat]

jugular

Pertaining to the throat or neck.

jugular

of or relating to the throat or neck, particularly the jugular veins, internal and external, that carry blood from the head to the anterior vena cava and hence to the heart.
References in classic literature ?
Slowly it shifted up along the jugular. All that saved White Fang from death was the loose skin of his neck and the thick fur that covered it.
'It is all over; there will be nothing the matter; money shall be got in; and if it don't come in fast enough, old Nickleby shall stump up again, or have his jugular separated if he dares to vex and hurt the little--'
His fangs were buried instantly in the jugular of his adversary and then a half hundred black men had leaped upon him and borne him to earth.