journal club


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A form of graduate—and, less commonly, continuing—education, in which a group of doctors discuss, analyse, and review a limited number of articles from medical journals, often on a weekly or monthly basis

journal club

A form of graduate–and less commonly, continuing medical—education used by physicians during the residency training period, in which a small group of physicians convenes, discusses, analyzes, and reviews a limited number of articles from major medical journals, often on a weekly or monthly basis
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Join (or start!) a journal club. Share your difficult cases with others and take note of how their advice differs from your approach.
Learn how reading poems in a leadership journal club can contribute to the development of emotional intelligence.
* Involvement in Mercy's journal club, in which nurses read and answer questions about clinical articles.
The documents reviewed in this NNJ Journal Club are from The Joint Commission (TJC) and address close calls and hazardous conditions.
This purpose of this study was to determine if the use of a journal club during a Level II, psychosocial fieldwork placement would increase students' confidence and perceived abilities in using component skills associated with EBP.
It all started with a handful of practicing endocrinologists of the city with their trainees as monthly endocrine Journal Club. Over the years it has evolved in a very organized learning experience where people who attend these meetings have a chance to share and learn from the experiences of other fellow endocrinologists.
Let the natural world be your inspiration and build community by starting a Nature Journal Club. johnmuirlaws.com/starting
The first documented journal club was organized in 1875 by William Osler at McGill University, to keep staff informed of medical science in a cost-effective manner.[1] Nowadays, journal club has already become a common form of interactive education in hope to keep medical practitioners up-to-date of current literature, understand research design and statistics, and expand critical appraisal skills.
Objective: Medical Education Journal Club is an evidence-based approach to teach and learn critical appraisal techniques on available literature.
A minority of programs included librarian participation in an EBM journal club (22%) or on clinical rounds (17%).
Journal club: Social media as an antimicrobial stewardship tool.

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