joint attention

joint attention

The ability to attract other people to look at things that you are interested in, usually by pointing at the object or staring at it intently.
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At thirteen months children begin to point at objects to initiate joint attention and identify objects of interest, as in the example with Logan and the butterfly.
Having intentional attitudes is sufficient, on his account, for even the most sophisticated non-linguistic interpersonal engagements with others, including the capacity for joint attention. Having such attitudes is a practical, embodied skill; and it is on these intentional attitudes that infants' grasp of propositional attitudes builds.
The affordances of the toy played a role in a variety of parent-child interactions and joint attention experiences.
One tool that physicians can use is the joint attention screen.
Within the first few months of life, babies display a basic form of what researchers call joint attention. An infant will maintain a steady gaze with a nearby adult and imitate that adult's simple actions.
(2) joint attention skills, which are the ability to focus attention on something that is pointed out to the child by another.
A CLOSE ENCOUNTER: Gateshead Thunder Under-18s' Crawford Matthews faces the joint attention of two East Leeds players (above) during his side's 16-10 defeat, while (left) Adam Burns in action against Saddleworth PICTURES: PAUL CLAYTON
Hugo Theoret of the University of Montreal, has stated, "If you imagine the behavioral and social deficits that would come from a failure of the mirror neuron system, you would imagine a pathology just like autism." Certainly, many of the earliest signs of autism--like the absence of joint attention behaviors and reciprocal play--strongly resonate with the idea of difficulties in establishing an inner "conversation" with another's mind in your mind.
These exchanges, labelled "joint attention sequences," are the literal food of love, and they build the most advanced human cognitive skills we will ever acquire: the abilities to interpret, empathise with and manage the reactions of others, in fact to be able, by the late teens, to stand in another's shoes while still keeping a hold on one's own perspective.
Although presentation of ASD is extremely varied, social deficits, including the lack of joint attention (defined as manifest enjoyment of sharing an object or event with another person by looking back and forth between the two) appears to be a reliable and early warning sign of ASD in infants.

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