Johnson

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Johnson

 [jon´son]
Dorothy E. Nursing educator and developer of the behavioral system model for nursing. Her chief interest has been in identifying the nature of service provided by nursing and in delineating the knowledge needed to provide that service.

John·son

(jon'sŏn),
Frank B., 20th-century U.S. pathologist. See: Dubin-Johnson syndrome.

John·son

(jon'sŏn),
Frank C., U.S. pediatrician, 1894-1934. See: Stevens-Johnson syndrome.

John·son

(jon'sŏn),
Harry B., U.S. dentist. See: Johnson method.

John·son

(jon'sŏn),
Treat Baldwin, U.S. chemist, 1875-1947. See: Wheeler-Johnson test.

Johnson, Dorothy E.

Etymology: Dorothy E. Johnson, American nurse, b. 1919 d. 1999
a nursing theorist who developed a behavioral systems model presented in Conceptual Models for Nursing Practice (Riehl and Roy, eds., 1973). Johnson's theory addresses two major components: the patient and nursing. The patient is a behavioral system with seven interrelated subsystems. Each subsystem has structural and functional requirements. The structural elements include drive or goal; predisposition to act; choice, alternatives for action; and behavior. The attachment-affiliative subsystem forms the basis for all social organization. The dependency subsystem promotes helping behavior. The biological (ingestive and eliminative) and sexual subsystems have to do with social and psychological functions as well as biological considerations. The function of the achievement subsystem is to attempt to manipulate the environment. The functions of the aggressive subsystem are protection and preservation. Johnson considered that problems in nursing are caused by disturbances in the structure or functions of the subsystems or the system. Her behavioral systems theory provides a conceptual framework for nursing education, practice, and research.
References in periodicals archive ?
The accounts of Robert Kennedy's subsequent visits to the Johnson suite -- three in all -- are jumbled and contradictory.
Sometime after JFK's final offer to Johnson, Graham phoned the nominee to express confusion that Bobby had again returned to Johnson's suite and was encouraging Lyndon to withdraw.
There was more: As Bobby recalled, JFK had concluded that Johnson "would be so mean as majority leader that it was better having him as vice president, where you could control him' And "particularly after you had offered him the job, then it would have been disastrous to have that affront and withdraw it.
In the wake of Bobby's last visit, a pall hung over the Johnson suite.
Joe Alsop believed that Bobby took the initiative to talk Johnson off the ticket and that Jack, seeking to avoid "an exhausting fraternal argument during an already stressful time," placated Bobby by allowing him to do so.
Bobby argued that when he had left the Kennedy suite to meet with Johnson, the two brothers had been in agreement; If Johnson seemed amenable, Bobby should ease him off the ticket.
Boutte urged Johnson to meet with William Blair & Co.
But Johnson soon found that Boutte and George Johnson weren't the only people with whom he'd have to strike a bargain.
He sent representatives to meet with Johnson and lay down the law: If he wanted Quinn's support--and millions of dollars in deposits from the state of Illinois--he would have to promise a significant increase in community lending.
Johnson says that, at first, the meetings with Quinn's people were pretty confrontational.
Johnson realized that Quinn and the community activists would have to be won over.
I learned an awful lot about Chicago and about the need for community banking services," says Johnson.

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