jock


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An Americanism for an athlete
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

'jock'

Vox populi An Americanism for an athlete. See Jock itch.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jock added: "This was very, very tough and it is a relief to finish, but rowing challenges like this bring our love of the sport alive."
Speaking to the Observer from his home in Maidstone, Kent, after the 2014 jump into Normandy, Jock said of his early Army days: "I hated every minute of it because there was just too much discipline."
As a young loon his lug wis aye cockit tae the news wi the fairm billies hame fae the war an in es fascinatin beuk o reminiscences we get true tales o the First World War experiences - hairt-brakkin an hairtwarmin alike - 59 ex sodjers sharin stories an aa recordit an screiv't bi Jock in their ain mither tongue.
If you ever needed someone to stand with you or watch your back, Jock was that man.
Do you know Jock? Do you have any memories of the Volunteer?
In a text message to Flotrack, which first reported the story, Jock wrote, "Once I arrived in the Bahamas and was informed I was an alternate, I was told three different and unsatisfactory reasons of why/how the decision was made.
Revenue from jock taxes imposed by most other states typically goes into the states' general fund; however, Tennessee's jock tax revenue was used "exclusively for the payment of, or the reimbursement of, as directed by the facility manager, expenses associated with securing current, expanded or new events for indoor sports facilities located in Tennessee" [section 67-4-1703(e)].
"One of Jock's quotes talks about how football is only ever about getting the two points.
Cumia and Hughes had actually been involved in problems because of their shock jock style of broadcasting.
He added: "We are greatly saddened to hear of Jock's death.
Churchill was so fond of Jock it was said that he would not start meals until he was at the table.
Jock died in the late 1950s, but now one of his stonemason's hammers has been donated to the cathedral by Coundon man Neil Starkie, who was given the tool by Jock's son Ron.