job lock


Also found in: Financial, Wikipedia.

job lock

Health care A situation in which a person is in effect–but not in actual fact–forced to remain in a job, due to fear of losing health care coverage or because a future employer's health plan won't cover a medical circumstance–eg, a pre-existing condition, in the employee or dependents. See Pre-existing condition.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
As the dependent coverage mandate succeeded in expanding coverage and has been found to have many other effects in the health care and labor markets, (1) we argue that our findings imply that job lock among young adults is insubstantial.
For instance, healthcare reform may free would-be entrepreneurs from job lock. In addition, financial education and training may show boomers how to leverage their resources to start a business, especially in the wake of the housing crisis when home equity is no longer the deep cushion.
"So it is remarkable to me--and this has been pretty well commented on in the wake of the report--that a Republican party that used to herald freedom, choice and opportunity, that used to call for specifically an end to job lock created by the need for health care and health insurance, is now finding in this report--which is overwhelmingly positive when it comes to its assessment of the Affordable Care Act--a political slogan that happens to be factually challenged."
Various studies in the fields of economics and psychology have investigated the phenomenon of job lock and its determinants following the perspective of their own field (some examples include [5-8]).
The main reason for this is a phenomenon known as "job lock," a term coined during the last round of debate over universal health coverage in the early 1990s.
But, with Hank at 53 or even at 60, there is an important exception to these scenarios, which Glenn Pransky at Liberty Mutual and colleagues call "job lock." A very large share of aging workers who are injured would like to leave work altogether but cannot because they need the income or the benefits such as their company health plan.
The impact of health on job mobility: A measure of job lock. Industrial and Labor Relations Review 51:282-97.
And Gatland's take on the job looks to be in line with Lewis' insistence that Gareth Jenkins' successor must want the job lock, stock and barrel rather than see it as second choice to the other vacant coaching jobs with nations like South Africa and New Zealand.
Based on the seminal compensating wage differential work of Rosen (1986), a considerable number of empirical studies have analyzed the effect of employer-provided health insurance on various forms of potential "job lock," such as decisions to retire, to change jobs, to participate in the labor market and the extent of participation (full time/part time), and to move from receiving public assistance to the workforce.
The lack of portability can lead to job lock' in which workers are hesitant to leave their job if anyone in the family is in less-than-perfect health."
"Job lock" can occur in at least four situations--1) when a worker retains health insurance by: continuing to work past the customary retirement age; 2) continuing to work in a job because it provides health insurance for the family in a two-earner family; 3) not accepting a job due to the loss of welfare benefits, which provide Medicaid; and 4) remaining in a job in which the worker may not be fully productive.