jnana yoga


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jnana yoga

A cerebral form of yoga which seeks the pathway to prana (transcendental wisdom) through meditation and thought.
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The Bhagavad Gita addresses the need for integrating karma yoga (selfless action), jnana yoga (the path of wisdom and right understanding), and bhakti yoga (the path of love and devotion).
Followers of jnana yoga who discriminate between the real and the unreal, the permanent and the transitory, systematically impress upon themselves the impermanence of their own body and mind and its three states of consciousness: waking, dream, and dreamless sleep.
At one point in one's life the Yoga of meditation (Jnana Yoga) is more suitable than, say, Hatha Yoga (physical postures); at another time neither Jnana Yoga nor Hatha Yoga is suitable, but Karma Yoga (the yoga of selfless action) is.
Karma Yoga, Bhakti Yoga, Jnana Yoga, and Raja Yoga are considered the four main yogas, but there are many other types.
Sources for Jewels of Yoga are the Upanishads, the Bhagavad Gita, the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali (the "uncontested bible of Raja yoga"), Narada Bhakti Sutras, and the Srimad Bhagavatam (two of the most revered of the Bhakti scriptures), the Astavakra Samhita (an important Jnana yoga scripture), and the Dhammapada (the yoga wisdom of the blessed Buddha).
This is poetry as literary criticism; it is Jnana yoga.
The first third deals with karma yoga (ways of selfless action), the second with jnana yoga (ways of self-knowledge), and the last with bhakti yoga (ways of love, devotions).
At the other extreme are those who see yoga everywhere in South Asian history, for instance attempting to include the entire history of bhakti and all the schools of Indian philosophy in their accounts, simply because the Bhagavad Gita refers to the path of devotion as bhakti yoga and the path of philosophical speculation as jnana yoga.
Chapters apply classical East Indian yogas as a means to perceive psychotherapy: psychotherapy as behavior change or karma yoga, psychotherapy as mindfulness practice or jnana yoga, and psychotherapy as opening the heart or bhakti yoga.
The center also excels in providing the balanced experience of other Yoga forms like Raja Yoga, Karma Yoga, Jnana Yoga and Bhakti Yoga.
The chapter describes mantra yoga, bhakti yoga, jnana yoga, karma yoga, and raja yoga.
Raja yoga and jnana yoga were not accessible to the majority of women, for example, who were expected in cultures of patriarchy to undertake family duties, nor to most individuals of lower caste, who were traditionally restricted from study or even hearing of the Vedas.