jitter

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jitter

(jĭt'ĕr),
The random variability of the cycle-to-cycle duration of vocal fold vibration; contributes to the perception of a rough or harsh voice quality.
Imaging Low amplitude irregularities in echo location on an ultrasound display, attributed to electronic noise, mechanical disturbances, and other nonspecific variables
Physiology Muscle jitter The normal electric variability—‘chaos’—measured by single-fiber EMG—in the interval between 2 action potentials of successive discharges of the same single muscle fiber in the same motor unit; jitter is characterised as instability in subcomponents of motor unit action potentials, and is due to the variation in the synaptic delay at the branch points in the distal axon and at the neuromuscular junction; like fiber density, jitter is increased in neuropathic conditions (motor neuron diseases)—e.g., myasthenia gravis—is accompanied by denervation and reinnervation, and attributed to inefficient transmission of impulses in recent neural collaterals, or due to blocking—abnormal neuromuscular transmission; it is normal or near-normal in myopathic disease
Psychology See Jitters

jitter

Imaging Low amplitude irregularities in echo location on an ultrasound display, attributed to electronic noise, mechanical disturbances, and other variables Neurophysiology Muscle jitter The normal electric variability–'chaos'–measured by single-fiber EMG–in the interval between 2 action potentials of successive discharges of the same single muscle fiber in the same motor unit; jitter is characterized as instability in subcomponents of motor unit action potentials, and is due to the variation in the synaptic delay at the branch points in the distal axon and at the neuromuscular junction; like fiber density, jitter is ↑ in neuropathic conditions–motor neuron diseases–eg, myasthenia gravis, is accompanied by denervation and reinnervation, and attributed to inefficient transmission of impulses in recent neural collaterals, or due to blocking–abnormal neuromuscular transmission; it is normal or near-normal in myopathic disease. See Fiber density, Single-fiber electromyography PsychologyJitters, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lines hastily thrown together with a sort of jittery, automatist flair form more or less absurd "con-figurations": sketchy figures, both elegantly drafted and shapeless, in fantastical scenarios.
Since 9/11, the downtown market has been jittery, although all signs seem now to be pointing to a steady recovery.
Planners of Sydney's Gay Games VI have encountered the added obstacles of a tough global economy and a jittery travel market.
Coppell said: "We do a lot of good work but when we are in a position to win it we get a bit jittery.
Athenaeum is on the other side of the firewall laid down by terrorists between a time when peaceful contemplation was at least a possibility and a period when contemplation itself was making Americans--this American--extremely jittery.
Many investors don't move because they feel they don't have the knowledge or become jittery after reading the recent news reports of anticipated inflation and rising interest rates that have made the stock market move up, down and sideways.
The new discovery, however, should not heighten the concern of jittery Angelinos because geologists knew that a blind thrust must have been down there, says Dolan.
Jittery MELROSE came from behind to beat STIRLING COUNTY with five second- half tries sealing a 35-11 victory.
Gwyneth Paltrow plays a Christian stick-in-the-mud, Evan Rachel Wood serves up an undercooked variation on her more resonant Lolita-pops, Jill Clayburgh is mostly zomboid as Finch's burned-out wife, and Joseph Fiennes is poignant enough, but a little too jittery, as the other, more disturbed ``adopted'' son who becomes Auggie's first lover.
But to describe these sequences at all necessarily ossifies them, since language can't account for their jittery kineticism (which is heightened by the momentum of Gordon's atonal, minimalist score).
Which of us hasn't met the "dear magnetic boy" who's used to having his ass kissed in "Narcissus" (an anthemic, hit-ready rocker underlined by jittery guitars that fondly reference the Smiths' "How Soon Is Now")?