jitter

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jitter

(jĭt'ĕr),
The random variability of the cycle-to-cycle duration of vocal fold vibration; contributes to the perception of a rough or harsh voice quality.
Imaging Low amplitude irregularities in echo location on an ultrasound display, attributed to electronic noise, mechanical disturbances, and other nonspecific variables
Physiology Muscle jitter The normal electric variability—‘chaos’—measured by single-fiber EMG—in the interval between 2 action potentials of successive discharges of the same single muscle fiber in the same motor unit; jitter is characterised as instability in subcomponents of motor unit action potentials, and is due to the variation in the synaptic delay at the branch points in the distal axon and at the neuromuscular junction; like fiber density, jitter is increased in neuropathic conditions (motor neuron diseases)—e.g., myasthenia gravis—is accompanied by denervation and reinnervation, and attributed to inefficient transmission of impulses in recent neural collaterals, or due to blocking—abnormal neuromuscular transmission; it is normal or near-normal in myopathic disease
Psychology See Jitters

jitter

Imaging Low amplitude irregularities in echo location on an ultrasound display, attributed to electronic noise, mechanical disturbances, and other variables Neurophysiology Muscle jitter The normal electric variability–'chaos'–measured by single-fiber EMG–in the interval between 2 action potentials of successive discharges of the same single muscle fiber in the same motor unit; jitter is characterized as instability in subcomponents of motor unit action potentials, and is due to the variation in the synaptic delay at the branch points in the distal axon and at the neuromuscular junction; like fiber density, jitter is ↑ in neuropathic conditions–motor neuron diseases–eg, myasthenia gravis, is accompanied by denervation and reinnervation, and attributed to inefficient transmission of impulses in recent neural collaterals, or due to blocking–abnormal neuromuscular transmission; it is normal or near-normal in myopathic disease. See Fiber density, Single-fiber electromyography PsychologyJitters, see there.
References in periodicals archive ?
SOUTHEND boss Alan Little was mightily relieved after his jittery side came close to throwing away a three-goal lead against struggling Shrewsbury.
Many investors don't move because they feel they don't have the knowledge or become jittery after reading the recent news reports of anticipated inflation and rising interest rates that have made the stock market move up, down and sideways.
For carriers using the Quality of Service standards in Netopia's products, there is less risk of jittery video, dropped phone calls and broken data streams, all of which can drive subscribers to competing providers," said Ray Smets, Netopia's Senior Vice President, Sales and Marketing.
County boss Gary Ablett said: "We were fantastic for an hour but then got jittery and were hanging on in the end.
As for the Chargers, well, if pro football is ever coming back to Anaheim, at least this entry wouldn't have a quarterback nicknamed Jittery Jim and a star tailback who tells his coach to go run ``47 Gap.
Lines hastily thrown together with a sort of jittery, automatist flair form more or less absurd "con-figurations": sketchy figures, both elegantly drafted and shapeless, in fantastical scenarios.
Since 9/11, the downtown market has been jittery, although all signs seem now to be pointing to a steady recovery.
Yet, what convinced most here was the jittery increment trajectory.
But Surrey pair Mark Butcher and Graham Thorpe combined to calm the jittery nerves and complete England's march to victory in only four overs yesterday to retain the Wisden Trophy, which they won in memorable fashion in England four years ago.
We look jittery at centre back and inadequate at right back.
The midfielder said: ``I know people will start getting jittery but you've got to get those negative thoughts out of your mind.
Which of us hasn't met the "dear magnetic boy" who's used to having his ass kissed in "Narcissus" (an anthemic, hit-ready rocker underlined by jittery guitars that fondly reference the Smiths' "How Soon Is Now")?