jerk

(redirected from jerkiness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

jerk

 [jerk]
a sudden reflex or involuntary movement.
Achilles jerk (ankle jerk) plantar extension of the foot elicited by a tap on the achilles tendon, while the patient is seated on a bed or chair, with feet hanging freely; called also Achilles reflex and triceps surae jerk or reflex.
biceps jerk biceps reflex.
elbow jerk involuntary flexion of the elbow on striking the tendon of the biceps or triceps muscle.
jaw jerk jaw-jerk reflex.
knee jerk see knee jerk.
tendon jerk tendon reflex.
triceps surae jerk ankle jerk.

jerk

(jerk),
1. A sudden pull.
2. Synonym(s): deep reflex

jerk

(jĕrk)
1. A sudden pull.
2. Synonym(s): deep reflex.

jerk

1. A sudden involuntary movement, usually of the head or a limb.
2. A reflex muscle or muscle group contraction in response to a sudden stretching by briskly tapping the tendon. A tendon reflex.

jerk

(jĕrk)
A sudden pull.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some examples of main temporal impairments are: motion compensation mismatch, mosquito noise, stationary area fluctuation, ghosting, jerkiness and smearing.
The gene therapy, called ProSavin, restored the monkeys' levels of dopamine, corrected motor problems and prevented dyskinesias, as jerkiness, rigidity and tremor are called.
Animated with deliberate jerkiness, their antics resemble the imaginary games slightly twisted 8-year-olds play when adults aren't looking.
Firstup, if youhave played the original Skate you will be able to pick up exactly where you left off, as the familiar analog stick Flickit system is still in use but with the added plus of a few new moves, like hand plants and grabs, and still manages to feel intuitive and fresh, plus the ability to leave your board and walk around the fictional city of San Van which makes up your sand box world, is a great idea, and it allows you to move items around to allow youto pull off some amazing tricks, althoughthecamera angles and jerkiness when you go on foot leaves a lot to be desired.
(34) Describing the last section of "Some occasional Reflections" (referring to its printed form "Fragment"), Patricia Meyer Spacks, Reading Eighteenth-Century Poetry (Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell, 2009), 15, analyzes the metrical shift that underscores the poem's resolution: "the frequent jerkiness" of the couplets preceding the concluding lines "dramatizes her agitation, implicitly contradicting her simple assertions of faith"; whereas the final alexandrine "slows to an achieved, appropriate, and persuasive serenity." (35) Barash, English Women's Poetry, 276.
Which is to say there wasn't a separate section of her discussion devoted to 'jerkiness' or 'jerkism' or 'jerkiciousness'.
He also wanted to smooth out the normal jerkiness of a freewheeling pedal stroke.
The resulting dreamlike resolution, familiarity, grainy texture, and hand-held jerkiness all prime our natural tendency to read the montage in terms of what Marita Sturken calls, in Acts of Memory: Cultural Recall in the Present (1999), "narratives of recovery." That permeable interface between the perceived and the mediated, between hard truth and soft technology reveals the "third meaning" of Home Movies, which is that all language--whether binary, mnemonic, or expressive--is endlessly modifiable and elastic.
As TME progresses, an infected animal becomes increasingly excited, arches its tail over its back, has ataxia, and displays jerkiness of hind limbs.
It takes some getting used to but the jerkiness can be mitigated by easing off on the throttle when changing gear.
He checked her eyes for suspicious jerkiness and insisted on a breath test for alcohol.