jennerian

jennerian

 [jĕ-ne´re-an]
relating to Edward Jenner, who developed smallpox vaccination.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rotavirus: the major etiological agent of severe infantile diarrhoea may be controllable by a "Jennerian" approach to vaccination.
But the impressive array of evidence that Thompson marshals indicates that Vietnamese healers did not adopt Chinese methods of combating smallpox until Jennerian vaccination had already been introduced from the West.
Rhesus rotavirus-based human rotavirus vaccines and observations on some non-"Jennerian" approaches to rotavirus vaccination.
Even later, "it was perfectly plausible around 1800 to represent Jennerian vaccination as balderdash" [7].
The publication of Kaitai Shinsho not only helped Japanese physicians correctly diagnose and treat their patients--even physicians who relied primarily on Chinese medical knowledge--but also led to other advances, most notably the embrace of Jennerian cowpox vaccination.
This was the moment when high-ranking political authorities in various parts of the country provided, for the first time, official support to the efforts by physicians to fight the smallpox disease through Jennerian vaccination.
The Vaccinators further adds to this argument by highlighting how these social networks worked to obtain the Jennerian vaccine to help prevent smallpox.
Those same practitioners, supported by Japanese families as well as those who wished to make inroads into the intentionally closed Japanese society, began to practice, in as circumspect a manner as possible, Jennerian vaccination.
The smallpox vaccine: its first century in Brazil (from the Jennerian to the animal vaccine) [in Spanish].
The neurology of Jennerian vaccination: a clinical account of the neurological complications which occurred during the smallpox epidemic in South Wales in 1962.
Vaccine efficacy is 95% among vaccinees in whom a 1-cm to 2-cm loculated and umbilicated pustule (called a Jennerian pustule) is noted 6 to 8 days after inoculation (see color Figure 12).
Thus it was perfectly plausible around 1800 to represent smallpox vaccination as quackish balderdash, as when, in `The Cow-Pock', Gillray spoofed Jennerian variolation.