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gel

 [jel]
1. a colloid in which the solid disperse phase forms a network in combination with that of the fluid continuous phase, resulting in a viscous semirigid sol.
2. to form such a compound or any similar semi-solid material.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

gel

(jel),
1. A jelly, or the solid or semisolid phase of a colloidal solution. Synonym(s): gelatum
2. To form a gel or jelly; to convert a sol into a gel.
[Mod. L. gelatum]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

gel

(jel)
1. A jelly, or the solid or semisolid phase of a colloidal solution.
2. To form a gel or jelly; to convert a solution into a gel.
[Mod. L. gelatum]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

gel

A largely liquid colloid, retained in a semisolid state by molecular chains, usually cross-linked.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

gel

a semi-rigid COLLOID as distinct from the more liquid SOL.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

gel

(jel)
1. A jelly, or the solid or semisolid phase of a colloidal solution.
2. To form a gel or jelly; to convert a sol into a gel.
[Mod. L. gelatum]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Jell also indicated that the horse will in all probability be aimed at the 2011 Dubai World Cup.
A police source said of Jell: "He was like a one-man graffiti crimewave."
The company's product line in the United States includes organic milk, a full line of organic dairy products and organic juices, pudding, fruit jells and eggs.
Woodall says he's "looking at several opportunites, but nothing has jelled yet."
During the 1980s, at the height of 1960s-bashing, the media stereotype jelled. Boomers - and we're all alike, of course - were overindulged as children, which led us to become hopelessly self-absorbed and self-centered.
After a slow start, the dancers jelled with Taylor's effervescent choreography, bounding, hopping, crawling, and tumbling across the stage like children at play.
The massive Flood, with its pitching wave-like form, gives the game away: Waldron's sculptures are amorphous moments that have jelled into spaces; that is, they are fluxes that have become crystallized and becalmed.
A consensus jelled that, as The Times wrote, "Harding fitted into the complex situation better than any of the candidates." At 2 a.m.--not 2:11--the group sent for the Ohioan and asked him if there were any personal factors that would disqualify him.