jejunoileal

jejunoileal

 [je-joo″no-il´e-al]
pertaining to the jejunum and ileum; connecting the proximal jejunum with the distal ileum.

je·ju·no·il·e·al

(je-jū'nō-il'ē-ăl),
Relating to the jejunum and the ileum.

je·ju·no·il·e·al

(jĕ-jū'nō-il'ē-ăl)
Relating to the jejunum and the ileum.

jejunoileal

pertaining to the jejunum and ileum; connecting the proximal jejunum with the distal ileum.
References in periodicals archive ?
An ischemic event is considered the most likely cause of jejunoileal atresia and is thought to occur between the 6th and 8th weeks of gestation.
Refractory diffuse bony pain 20 years after jejunoileal bypass.
A proposed classification system for familial intestinal atresia and its relevance to the understanding of the etiology of jejunoileal atresia.
Oxalate nephropathy leading to irreversible renal failure is a well-described complication of jejunoileal bypass, one of the early surgical approaches for correction of morbid obesity, (33) and continues to be seen as a complication of roux-en-Y gastric bypass.
Pregnancy after jejunoileal bypass and the SGA infant.
15) The visualization of a gallstone on gastroscopy appears to be the only significant differentiating factor between the gastric outlet obstruction of Bouveret syndrome and the jejunoileal obstruction of the classic gallstone ileus.
Nonalcoholic steatonecrosis is also seen in Type 2 diabetes and after jejunoileal bypass.
These conditions vary from surgical procedures such as jejunoileal bypass and intestinal resection, rapid weight loss, drugs, total parenteral nutrition to metabolic disorders.
The bariatric surgery patients with PN were also more likely to have undergone jejunoileal bypass than those without (9 vs.
In the 1970s, in the Danish Obesity Project, clinical researchers wanted to compare the effects of jejunoileal bypass with medical treatment of morbid obesity.
On the other hand, a series of gastrointestinal disturbances such as inflammatory bowel disease, small bowel resection, or jejunoileal bypass (connection of the duodenum to the colon) may set up the patient for hyperabsorption of oxalate from dietary sources and increase the incidence of stones.