jealous

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Related to jealously: jealousy

jealous

(jĕl′əs)
adj.
1. Envious or resentful of the good fortune or achievements of another: I felt jealous when my coworker got a promotion.
2. Fearful or wary of losing one's position or situation to someone else, especially in a sexual relationship: Her new boyfriend was jealous of her male friends.
3. Having to do with or arising from feelings of envy, apprehension, or bitterness: jealous thoughts.

jeal′ous·ly adv.
jeal′ous·ness n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Shaun Emmott, 31, was driven to kill 29-year-old Jacqueline Howell by a violent and aggressive temper and intense jealously, a jury at Cardiff Crown Court heard.
Swinging is fertile ground for jealously. But perhaps the worst damage that it can do is to break down the taboos of fidelity.
It's not her total lack of medical knowledge holding her back this week or even her three kids, but her sister, Maddy, who is also a Sister (of the nursing variety) and mad with jealously at Rhoda's success.
But the US has jealously guarded control of all key decisions in the country in the wake of the war.
Interviews prior to this all reported Mr Scott as a buttoned-up, introspective, working class Scotsman, who jealously guarded his private life and was not given to spontaneous displays of emotion.
He jealously guards his privacy and refuses to have his telephone number listed in the Paris telephone book.
Male sexual jealously was the main cause of domestic violence, the study in Personal Relationships journal said.
And the potential damage to BP's jealously - and expensively - guarded reputation should keep them on their toes.
Producers guard sales figures jealously but Dom Perignon, Bollinger and Krug are among the top 10 together with Moet et Chandon.
Cooper admits Middlesbrough have looked jealously at Newcastle over recent years as they competed for the Premiership title and played in the Champions League.
On Thursday I came back to my Mini to find a warden jealously guarding it, ready to stick a notice on as soon as his clock ticked a minute past the due time.
Its owners used to jealously guard the rights to the characters, but in recent years have started to exploit their commercial potential.