jealous


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

jealous

(jĕl′əs)
adj.
1. Envious or resentful of the good fortune or achievements of another: I felt jealous when my coworker got a promotion.
2. Fearful or wary of losing one's position or situation to someone else, especially in a sexual relationship: Her new boyfriend was jealous of her male friends.
3. Having to do with or arising from feelings of envy, apprehension, or bitterness: jealous thoughts.

jeal′ous·ly adv.
jeal′ous·ness n.
References in classic literature ?
I see what it is, you are jealous of him; but do not think that I can be turned against him.
She is jealous of everybody and everything," he replied bitterly, "and she cares for nobody and for nothing.
You deserve it for being jealous of me," said Agatha.
It is, indeed, very possible for jealous persons to kill the objects of their jealousy, but not to hate them.
Let others act the part of a jealous husband, not I.
Certain visitors may be received, certain preferences shown, which expose young women to remark, and which are enough to drive out of their senses even those husbands who are least disposed to be jealous.
Here Miss Jane (previously instructed for the purpose) interposed her many curls and whispered her sister to observe how jealous Mr Cheggs was.
Yes, yes," she said, evidently trying to suppress her jealous thoughts.
Here we go in a flung festoon, Half-way up to the jealous moon
User freym asked, "Do you ever get jealous of the relationship your husband has with Jimmy Fallon?
Summary: According to a source, the reality star just wanted to make former partner Scott Disick jealous