jargon

(redirected from jargons)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

jar·gon

(jar'gŏn),
Language or terminology peculiar to a specific field, profession, or group.
See also: paraphasia.
[Fr. gibberish]
(1) Language peculiar to a group or profession—medical, legal, etc.
(2) A specialized term, phrase, or acronym, that is either created for a particular purpose—e.g., nutmeg liver—or is a new use—e.g., organ transplant for scavenging parts from a ‘dying’ computer—for an extant term

jargon

Sociology A specialized term, phrase, or acronym, that is either created for a particular purpose–eg, nutmeg liver or is a new use–eg, organ transplant for computers–for an extant term; language peculiar to a group or profession, medical, legal, etc. Cf Dialect, Slang.

jar·gon

(jahr'gŏn)
1. Language or terminology peculiar to a specific field, profession, or group.
2. Nonsensical speech due to insult or trauma to the brain.
[Fr. gibberish]

jargon

1. Technical or specialized language used in an inappropriate context to display status or exclusiveness.
2. The formulation of fluent but meaningless chatter by combining unrelated syllables or words. Jargon is sometimes a feature of APHASIA.

jar·gon

(jahr'gŏn)
Language or terminology peculiar to a specific field, profession, or group.
[Fr. gibberish]
References in periodicals archive ?
Professors are jealous of amateur thinkers' independence (and vice versa); each academic discipline covets its neighbor's superior insights (literary studies envies philosophy, which in turn envies law and/ or science); and on the level of language, each discipline attempts to create a technical vocabulary specific to its area of expertise (a k a jargon), while at the same time longing for "a universal language understood by all."
The last and most argumentative chapter of Academic Instincts is about jargon, which Garber refers to as "Terms of Art." Jargon is the cultural theorist's Achilles' heel, the point at which the tension between the public and private intellectual is greatest.
So why don't would-be public intellectuals--professional academics who covet the breadth and audience of an amateur--simply eschew their disciplinary jargon? The reason is that jargon actually plays a double function; as the linguist Walter Nash writes in Jargon: Its Uses and Abuses (1993), it is not only "shop talk" but also "show talk," a means of impressing, sometimes mystifying, the uninitiated.
As you read through the articles in this issue, try to spot jargon. The "rule of thumb" (jargon that originated before rulers were commonplace) is that, if you are not certain whether or not a term is jargon, then it is probably jargon.
This kid is wicked groovy with jargon. So don't get all bent, I dig it, hear me?