jargon

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jar·gon

(jar'gŏn),
Language or terminology peculiar to a specific field, profession, or group.
See also: paraphasia.
[Fr. gibberish]

jargon (jar.)

[jär′gən]
Etymology: Fr, jargonner, to speak indistinctly
1 incoherent speech or gibberish.
2 a terminology used by scientists, artists, or others of a professional subculture that is not understood by the general population.
3 a state in child language acquisition characterized by strings of babbled sounds paired with gestures.
(1) Language peculiar to a group or profession—medical, legal, etc.
(2) A specialized term, phrase, or acronym, that is either created for a particular purpose—e.g., nutmeg liver—or is a new use—e.g., organ transplant for scavenging parts from a ‘dying’ computer—for an extant term

jargon

Sociology A specialized term, phrase, or acronym, that is either created for a particular purpose–eg, nutmeg liver or is a new use–eg, organ transplant for computers–for an extant term; language peculiar to a group or profession, medical, legal, etc. Cf Dialect, Slang.

jar·gon

(jahr'gŏn)
1. Language or terminology peculiar to a specific field, profession, or group.
2. Nonsensical speech due to insult or trauma to the brain.
[Fr. gibberish]

jargon

1. Technical or specialized language used in an inappropriate context to display status or exclusiveness.
2. The formulation of fluent but meaningless chatter by combining unrelated syllables or words. Jargon is sometimes a feature of APHASIA.

jar·gon

(jahr'gŏn)
Language or terminology peculiar to a specific field, profession, or group.
[Fr. gibberish]
References in periodicals archive ?
Harsher examiners than I might find even Hopkins himself sometimes too jargonistic.
To suppose that they are irrelevant when they are not explicitly and directly invoked in jargonistic formulations misses the richness of our ordinary moral language and discourse.
Although the terminology was selected for its neutrality, the jargonistic language often obfuscates the vitality of the discussion, impinging on its readability.
In addition, it is largely free of the jargonistic language of theory.
Her voice shifts between lucid clarity and jargonistic obfuscation.
1993) illustrates the diversity of management experience and expectation of quality initiatives in a range of sectors and organizations Judging by some of the comments, some managers felt that TQM symbolized the latest in a long line of management fads, utilizing jargonistic language and possessing little substance.
12, 18) to see that the attempt at bringing data to bear on metatheory will result, at best, in the sort of jargonistic descriptions quoted.
One can quickly see the overlap of these areas of process skills with the new AASL standards and the treatment here is a bit less jargonistic and straight forward, making it easier to get your head around and use with other members of the teaching staff.
The elusiveness of Vining's work does not result, as is so often the case, from ponderous prose or jargonistic terminology: on the contrary, Vining's vocabulary is modest and often poetic, and his prose can be lyrical.
Indeed the education and lifelong learning department seems to thrive on publishing jargonistic policy documents before condemning any objective criticism for being negative and nonconsensual.
Loertscher (2006) quotes Allison Zmuda (2006) as saying, "We must speak the various languages of our clients rather than expecting them to understand our jargonistic eloquence" (p.