jargon

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jar·gon

(jar'gŏn),
Language or terminology peculiar to a specific field, profession, or group.
See also: paraphasia.
[Fr. gibberish]

jargon (jar.)

[jär′gən]
Etymology: Fr, jargonner, to speak indistinctly
1 incoherent speech or gibberish.
2 a terminology used by scientists, artists, or others of a professional subculture that is not understood by the general population.
3 a state in child language acquisition characterized by strings of babbled sounds paired with gestures.
(1) Language peculiar to a group or profession—medical, legal, etc.
(2) A specialized term, phrase, or acronym, that is either created for a particular purpose—e.g., nutmeg liver—or is a new use—e.g., organ transplant for scavenging parts from a ‘dying’ computer—for an extant term

jargon

Sociology A specialized term, phrase, or acronym, that is either created for a particular purpose–eg, nutmeg liver or is a new use–eg, organ transplant for computers–for an extant term; language peculiar to a group or profession, medical, legal, etc. Cf Dialect, Slang.

jar·gon

(jahr'gŏn)
1. Language or terminology peculiar to a specific field, profession, or group.
2. Nonsensical speech due to insult or trauma to the brain.
[Fr. gibberish]

jargon

1. Technical or specialized language used in an inappropriate context to display status or exclusiveness.
2. The formulation of fluent but meaningless chatter by combining unrelated syllables or words. Jargon is sometimes a feature of APHASIA.

jar·gon

(jahr'gŏn)
Language or terminology peculiar to a specific field, profession, or group.
[Fr. gibberish]
References in periodicals archive ?
Harsher examiners than I might find even Hopkins himself sometimes too jargonistic.
Opacity equals profundity, we all believe, the denser the better, the more convoluted, jargonistic, clever, and conceited (only in the sense of arrogance, never itself a conceit), the more we hail the work as endlessly quotable, to be elevated to the stature of self-evident truth.
Hence, through an analysis grounded in an excellent blend of historical moment, movement, and structure, the book elucidates many otherwise jargonistic concepts from that perspective.
It is also a very personal book: jargonistic, categorical, and forthright, but given the range of Kendrick's reading and depth of his intelligence it is no less useful for that.