jargon


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to jargon: Computer jargon

jar·gon

(jar'gŏn),
Language or terminology peculiar to a specific field, profession, or group.
See also: paraphasia.
[Fr. gibberish]

jargon (jar.)

[jär′gən]
Etymology: Fr, jargonner, to speak indistinctly
1 incoherent speech or gibberish.
2 a terminology used by scientists, artists, or others of a professional subculture that is not understood by the general population.
3 a state in child language acquisition characterized by strings of babbled sounds paired with gestures.
(1) Language peculiar to a group or profession—medical, legal, etc.
(2) A specialized term, phrase, or acronym, that is either created for a particular purpose—e.g., nutmeg liver—or is a new use—e.g., organ transplant for scavenging parts from a ‘dying’ computer—for an extant term

jargon

Sociology A specialized term, phrase, or acronym, that is either created for a particular purpose–eg, nutmeg liver or is a new use–eg, organ transplant for computers–for an extant term; language peculiar to a group or profession, medical, legal, etc. Cf Dialect, Slang.

jar·gon

(jahr'gŏn)
1. Language or terminology peculiar to a specific field, profession, or group.
2. Nonsensical speech due to insult or trauma to the brain.
[Fr. gibberish]

jargon

1. Technical or specialized language used in an inappropriate context to display status or exclusiveness.
2. The formulation of fluent but meaningless chatter by combining unrelated syllables or words. Jargon is sometimes a feature of APHASIA.

jar·gon

(jahr'gŏn)
Language or terminology peculiar to a specific field, profession, or group.
[Fr. gibberish]
References in periodicals archive ?
Jargon Public Relations launches with several clients including, the UK Oracle User Group, the world's leading Oracle User Group, Pentura, the UK's first Risk Management Service Provider and FINCAD, a global leader in financial analytics.
There is plenty of nutrition and fitness advice here but it is wrapped up in jargon and Sex and the City language.
WORKERS and managers who use office jargon such as "blue sky thinking" and "singing from the same hymn sheet" have been warned that the phrases are out of date and should be replaced with newer buzzwords.
The internet is no less prone to meaningless jargon than architecture.
However, the chewing of coca leaves and the use of prison jargon were common elements of prisoner subculture.
Second is an activity we call "speed dating"--collaboration exercises in which participants ask questions of another functional specialty, answer questions about their own specialty, and explain jargon terms within their specialty that are commonly misunderstood.
PENSION providers have been told to junk the jargon and spell out in simple terms what people will get for their money.
Black-and-white photographs illustrate this serious-minded guide that presents basic information as thoroughly as possible without straying into an excess of technical jargon.
From "absolutism" and "access law" to "zines" and "zoom lens", terms defined include philosophical ideas, trade jargon, techno-speak, and even some brief biographies of landmark media figures, or summaries of pivotal media-related court cases.
Now in an fully updated eighth edition, Jane Straus' easy to use reference guide and workbook, The Blue Book Of Grammar And Punctuation: The Mysteries Of Grammar And Punctuation Revealed, provides writers with the rules of writer free from jargon while utilizing real-world examples of proper grammar and correct punctuation that are universal in their cultural content.
Outing" is homosexual jargon for public manifestation of one's disorder.