isotope

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isotope

 [i´so-tōp]
a chemical element having the same atomic number as another (i.e., the same number of nuclear protons), but having a different atomic mass (i.e., a different number of nuclear neutrons).
radioactive isotope radioisotope.
stable isotope one that does not transmute into another element with emission of corpuscular or electromagnetic radiations.

i·so·tope

(ī'sō-tōp), An isotope is identified by its symbol preceded by a superscript numeral showing its mass number (12C). Alternatively the mass number may follow the symbol at the same level (C 12). When the name of the element rather than its symbol is used, the numeral must follow and not precede the name (carbon 12). Do not join the numeral to the symbol or the name with a hyphen. The atomic number of an element (the unvarying number of protons in its nucleus) may be shown by a subscript numeral preceding the symbol 6C).
One of two or more nuclides that are chemically identical, having the same number of protons, yet differ in mass number, because their nuclei contain different numbers of neutrons; individual isotopes are names with the inclusion of their mass number in the superscript position (12C) and the atomic number (nuclear protons in the subscript position (6C). In former usage, the mass numbers follow the chemical symbol (C-12).
[iso- + G. topos, part, place]

isotope

Imaging
An MRI term for atomic nuclei that contain the same number of protons, but differ in the number of neutrons in the nucleus of the atom for the element concerned.

i·so·tope

(ī'sŏ-tōp)
One of two or more nuclides that are chemically identical, having the same number of protons, yet differ in mass number, because their nuclei contain different numbers of neutrons; individual isotopes are named with the inclusion of their mass number in the superior position (12C) and the atomic number (nuclear protons) in the inferior position (6C).
[iso- + G. topos, part, place]

isotope

Chemically identical elements whose atomic nuclei have the same number of protons but different numbers of neutrons. The number of protons determines the number of orbital electrons and hence the chemical properties. Radioactive isotopes are called radionuclides. From the Greek iso -, equal and topos , place. Isotopes occupy the same place in the Periodic table of the elements.

isotope

any of the forms of an element having the same number of protons (atomic number) but a different number of neutrons (atomic mass). Some isotopes of an element may be radioisotopes (e.g. 12C is not radioactive while 14C is) and yet can function normally in biological material. Isotopes can thus be ‘tagged’ (using suitable detection devices such as geiger counters and autoradiography) as biochemical processes occur. See HALF-LIFE, AUTO RADIO GRAPH.

Isotope

An unstable form of an element that gives off radiation to become stable. Elements are characterized by the number of electrons around each atom. One electron's negative charge balances the positive charge of each proton in the nucleus. To keep all those positive charges in the nucleus from repelling each other (like the same poles of magnets), neutrons are added. Only certain numbers of neutrons work. Other numbers cannot hold the nucleus together, so it splits apart, giving off ionizing radiation. Sometimes one of the split products is not stable either, so another split takes place. The process is called radioactivity.

i·so·tope

(ī'sŏ-tōp)
One of two or more nuclides that are chemically identical, having the same number of protons, yet differ in mass number, because their nuclei contain different numbers of neutrons.
[iso- + G. topos, part, place]
References in periodicals archive ?
Maize was the first food tracked isotopically in archaeological human diet because of how sharply it stands out against pre-agricultural, isotopically dissimilar ([C.sub.3]) background of most New World diets (J.
Expectations for Hypothesis 3: We expect some or all of the remains (1) to be morphologically diverse, with a possible mix of ancestral backgrounds including European and Native American ancestry consistent with the central Missouri region, (2) to exhibit a range of mtDNA haplogroups known to be in high frequency for Native Americans or European Americans, and (3) to be isotopically consistent with strontium isotope range of 0.7089-0.7123, which represents the central Missouri region.
Regarding the inability to beat the random alloy limit in isotopically modified SWCNT superlattice, there indeed exists a new strategy by creating random multilayer structures to block the coherent phonons that contribute a significant amount of heat transfer in regular superlattices [33, 34, 57, 235].
Such covariation suggests a mixing of two endmember fluids at varying ratios--one being a more evolved fluid with elevated Sr isotope ratios and isotopically heavy sulphate, possibly derived from reworked porewater, and the other being a fluid bearing isotopically light sulphate and less radiogenic Sr isotope signature, possibly representing the original porewater (Maynard et al.
Given the difficulty associated with trying to create isotopically depleted compositions, it was determined that this was as close to the target values for the intermediate mix as was feasible.
(iii) a very large (possibly isotopically enriched) mass, of the order of one tonne or larger;
Inyushkin, "Thermal conductivity of isotopically modified silicon: current status of research1," Inorganic Materials, vol.
The values of the Response Factor (RF) were determined by using standard solutions containing known concentration of isotopically labeled BPA analogue and nine different concentrations of BPA analyte.
This carbon-isotope excursion has been ascribed to the release, in discrete stepwise pulses, of isotopically light carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system [9].
Isotopically exchangeable and non-exchangeable adsorbed phosphate in relation to soil properties," Pakistan Journal of Soil Science, vol.
HEK293T cells were cultured in SILAC DMEM (Pierce) lacking lysine and arginine that was supplemented with isotopically enriched forms of L-Leucine ([sup.13][C.sub.6], 50 [micro]g/mL), (L-lysine ([sup.13][C.sub.6], [sup.15][N.sub.2] hydrochloride; 50 [micro]g/mL), and L-arginine ([sup.13][C.sub.6], [sup.15][N.sub.4] hydrochloride; 40 [micro]g/mL) (heavy) or the corresponding unlabeled form of each at the same concentration (light).
After re-checking the calculations, suspicion fell on the method by which isotopically labelled nitrogen ([sup.15]N) was added to the sample.