isoprene


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Related to isoprene: isoprene rule

isoprene

 [i´so-prēn]
an unsaturated, branched-chain, five-carbon hydrocarbon that is the molecular unit of isoprenoid compounds.

i·so·prene

(ī'sō-prēn),
2-Methyl-1,3-butadiene; an unsaturated five-carbon hydrocarbon with a branched chain, which in the plant and animal kingdom is used as the basis for the formation of isoprenoids, for example, terpenes, carotenoids and related pigments, rubber. Fat-soluble vitamins either are isoprenoid or have isoprenoid side chains; steroids are synthesized via isoprenoid intermediates, as are ubiquinone, dolichol, and prenylated proteins.

isoprene

/iso·prene/ (i´so-prēn) an unsaturated, branched chain, five-carbon hydrocarbon that is the molecular unit of the isoprenoid compounds.
Isoprene.

i·so·prene

(ī'sō-prēn)
An unsaturated five-carbon hydrocarbon with a branched chain, the basis for the formation of isoprenoids (terpenes, carotenoids, and rubber). Fat-soluble vitamins either are isoprenoid or have isoprenoid side chains; steroids are synthesized through isoprenoid intermediates.

isoprene (īˑ·sō·prēn),

n the fundamental unit of compounds known as terpenes. It has a molecular formula of C5H8 and can be described as aliphatic or acyclic. See also terpenes.

isoprene

hydrocarbon 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene; building block for many lipids including cholesterol, steroids and bile acids, the lipid-soluble vitamins, dolichol, coenzyme Q and many more terpenoid biomolecules.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both isoprene and butadiene could be polymerized to 1,4 and vinyl (3,4 for isoprene, 1,2 for butadiene) structure.
In a single day, the world's plants emit more isoprene than manufacturers use in a year.
His study found that isoprene, once it is altered chemically via exposure to the sun, reacts with man-made nitrogen oxides to create particulate matter.
Other examples of biobased incumbents include ethanol, ethylene, ethylene glycol, acrylic acid, isoprene, terephthalic acid, butanediol, biosyn-gas, and glycerol carbonate.
Polymerized IR has been successfully polymerized using isoprene produced with biomass by Ajinomoto, which has the world's most advanced fermentation technologies.
RS Butyl rubber is created by polymerizing isobutene with small amounts of isoprene at roughly -100[degrees]C, using cationic polymerization.
Also new from Lanxess is a unique high-isoprene butyl rubber that contains up to four times as much isoprene as regular butyl rubber.
For example, in a study of the chemical isoprene, female rats were exposed to 0, 220, 700, or 7,000 ppm isoprene by inhalation for 2 years (NTP 1999).
One such experiment using iron sulphate fertilizer yielded troubling results such as release of isoprene, another GHG (Dalton, 2002).
Outputs could include: proteins for feeding humans and livestock; sugars for direct consumption; cellulose fibres for use as textiles; isoprene, rubbers and sealants; or sustainable fuels including hydrogen (from water and ethanol.
Hosler and Michael have shown how the chemicals in vine juice are able to hook chains of isoprene together to make bouncy rubber.
Other types of synthetic rubber imported by then country include polybutadiene styrene latex, isobutene isoprene (butyl) rubber (IIR), isoprene rubber (IR) and ethylene propylene non conjugated diene rubber (EPDM).