autolysis

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autolysis

 [aw-tol´ĭ-sis]
the disintegration of cells or tissues by endogenous enzymes. adj., adj autolyt´ic.

au·tol·y·sis

(aw-tol'i-sis),
1. Enzymatic digestion of cells (especially dead or degenerate) by enzymes present within them (autogenous).
2. Destruction of cells as a result of the presence of a lysin formed in those cells or others in the same organism.
[auto- + G. lysis, dissolution]

autolysis

/au·tol·y·sis/ (aw-tol´ĭ-sis)
1. spontaneous disintegration of cells or tissues by autologous enzymes, as occurs after death and in some pathologic conditions.
2. destruction of cells of the body by its own serum.autolyt´ic

autolysis

(ô-tŏl′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
The breaking down of cells or tissues by their own enzymes. Also called self-digestion.

au′to·lyt′ic (ô′tə-lĭt′ĭk) adj.

autolysis

[ôtol′isis]
the spontaneous destruction of tissues by intracellular enzymes. It generally occurs in the body after death.

autolysis

Spontaneous lysis of cells and tissues caused by the release of lysosomal enzymes. Autolysis is a characteristic postmortem finding and is present in an increasing number of tissues as the body “ages”. Autolysis first appears in the pancreas, which is related to the quantity of hydrolytic enzymes in the pancreas.

au·tol·y·sis

(aw-tol'i-sis)
1. Enzymatic digestion of cells (especially dead or degenerate) by enzymes present within them (autogenous).
2. Destruction of cells as a result of a lysin formed in those cells or others in the same organism.
Synonym(s): autocytolysis, autodigestion, isophagy.
[auto- + G. lysis, dissolution]

autolysis

The destruction of tissues or cells by substances, such as ENZYMES, present in the same body.

autolysis

the breakdown of tissues, usually after death, by their own enzymes.

autolysis

enzymic degradation of degenerate cells, e.g. the conversion of skin cells to keratin

autolysis

the disintegration of cells or tissues by endogenous enzymes. See also postmortem decomposition.