isometric

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Related to isometrically: Isometric contraction

isometric

 [i″so-met´rik]
maintaining, or pertaining to, the same length; of equal dimensions.

i·so·met·ric

(ī'sō-met'rik),
1. Of equal dimensions.
2. In physiology, denoting the condition when the ends of a contracting muscle are held fixed so that contraction produces increased tension at a constant overall length. Compare: auxotonic, isotonic (3), isovolumic.
[iso- + G. metron, measure]

isometric

/iso·met·ric/ (-met´rik) maintaining, or pertaining to, the same measure of length; of equal dimensions.

isometric

(ī′sə-mĕt′rĭk)
adj. also i′somet′rical (-rĭ-kəl)
1. Of or exhibiting equality in dimensions or measurements.
2. Of or being a crystal system of three equal axes lying at right angles to each other.
3. Physiology Of or involving muscular contraction against resistance in which the length of the muscle remains the same.
n.
A line connecting isometric points.

i′so·met′ri·cal·ly adv.

isometric

[ī′səmet′rik]
Etymology: Gk, isos + metron, measure
maintaining the same length or dimension.

exercise

Public health The rhythmic contraction of muscles against a force Pros ↓ risk of cholecystectomy, ↓ risk of CAD, CHD, CA–colorectal, breast, prostate, DM–improved insulin utilization, obesity, stroke, osteoporosis, stress, anxiety; ↑ sexual pleasure, strength, flexibility, stamina, psychological well-being, general health; improved reaction time, memory, moods, immune resistance, sleep, self-confidence, control of arthritis, weight, quality of life. See Aerobic exercise, Anaerobic exercise, Breathing exercise, Cardiovascular exercise, Codman's pendulum exercise, Hoshino exercise, Isometric exercise, Isotonic exercise, Pritikin exercise, Vigorous exercise.
Exercise
Muscle
Isometric Exercise against an unmoving resistance; isometric exercises consist of muscle contraction with a minimum of other body movements; isometric exercises build muscle strength and include weight-lifting or squeezing a tennis ball
Isotonic Dynamic exercise Isotonic exercise consists of continuous and sustained movement of the arms and legs; isotonic exercises are beneficial to the cardiorespiratory systems and include running and bicycling
Whole body
Low-impact aerobics Any type of aerobic exercise that promotes physical fitness, but does not stress musculoskeletal tissues, and joints; low-impact aerobic exercises include walking, swimming, bicycling
High-impact aerobics Any type of aerobic exercise that promotes physical fitness, at the risk of stress to musculoskeletal tissues, and joints; high-impact aerobic exercises include aerobic dancing, basketball, running, volleyball
Exercise-kcal consumed/hour
Distance running (15 km/hour)  1000
Contact sports (wrestling, karate)   900
Bicycling (25 km/hour)   800
Swimming, freestyle   800
Basketball, volleyball  700
Jogging (9 km/hour)  600
Tennis   500
Coitus   450
Walking  400

i·so·met·ric

(ī'sō-met'rik)
1. Of equal dimensions.
2. physiology Denoting the condition when the ends of a contracting muscle are held fixed so that contraction produces increased tension at a constant overall length.
Compare: auxotonic, isotonic (3) , isovolumic
[iso- + G. metron, measure]

isometric

1. Of equal dimensions or length.
2. Of muscular tightening, in which an increase in tension occurs without shortening.

isometric

  1. of similar or equal measure.
  2. pertaining to a muscle under tension without contraction or change in length.

isometric (īˈ·sō·meˑ·trik),

n muscle contraction that does not involve any change in the muscle length.

iso·met·ric

(ī'sō-met'rik)
Of equal dimensions.
[iso- + G. metron, measure]

isometric

maintaining, or pertaining to, the same length; of equal dimensions.

isometric contraction
muscle contraction without appreciable shortening or change in distance between its origin and insertion.
isometric exercise
active exercise performed against stable resistance, without change in the length of the muscle.
References in periodicals archive ?
The therapist asks the patient to isometrically contract the agonist for around 6 seconds before it gets moved further into range.
It was hypothesized that linear measurements of the jaw would scale isometrically and that estimates of mechanical advantage would have no relationship as the individual grows.
With regard to this, Nomizu [3] proved the following: Let M be an n-dimensional, connected, complete Riemannian manifold which is isometrically immersed in a Euclidean space [E.
Next, the patient is instructed to resist this movement with minimum force, isometrically, for about 10 seconds, and then told to let go (or relax).
An essential step in the construction of the triangulation consists of isometrically embedding of En in some RN, for large enough N (see [36]), where the existence of such an embedding is guaranteed by Nash's Theorem ([34]).
This allows your muscles to contract isometrically (without changing length), which is safe on the body and provides an easy readjustment to normal posture after birth.
We performed the experiment isometrically at the elbow joint to both minimize nonreflex contributions and manifest and characterize hyperactive reflexes accurately.
n] with non-constant and negative scalar curvature is a K-special conformally at manifold and also it is proved that such a simply connected manifold with non-constant and negative scalar curvature can be isometrically immersed in an Euclidean manifold [E.
be an m-dimensional Riemannian manifold and M be an n-dimensional isometrically immersed submanifold in [?
However, papilla size scales isometrically with pad-size, thereby excluding the use of this method on smaller mammals such as marten (Martes americana) and weasels (Mustela spp.