isometric

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Related to isometrically: Isometric contraction

isometric

 [i″so-met´rik]
maintaining, or pertaining to, the same length; of equal dimensions.

i·so·met·ric

(ī'sō-met'rik),
1. Of equal dimensions.
2. In physiology, denoting the condition when the ends of a contracting muscle are held fixed so that contraction produces increased tension at a constant overall length. Compare: auxotonic, isotonic (3), isovolumic.
[iso- + G. metron, measure]

isometric

/iso·met·ric/ (-met´rik) maintaining, or pertaining to, the same measure of length; of equal dimensions.

isometric

(ī′sə-mĕt′rĭk)
adj. also i′somet′rical (-rĭ-kəl)
1. Of or exhibiting equality in dimensions or measurements.
2. Of or being a crystal system of three equal axes lying at right angles to each other.
3. Physiology Of or involving muscular contraction against resistance in which the length of the muscle remains the same.
n.
A line connecting isometric points.

i′so·met′ri·cal·ly adv.

isometric

[ī′səmet′rik]
Etymology: Gk, isos + metron, measure
maintaining the same length or dimension.

exercise

Public health The rhythmic contraction of muscles against a force Pros ↓ risk of cholecystectomy, ↓ risk of CAD, CHD, CA–colorectal, breast, prostate, DM–improved insulin utilization, obesity, stroke, osteoporosis, stress, anxiety; ↑ sexual pleasure, strength, flexibility, stamina, psychological well-being, general health; improved reaction time, memory, moods, immune resistance, sleep, self-confidence, control of arthritis, weight, quality of life. See Aerobic exercise, Anaerobic exercise, Breathing exercise, Cardiovascular exercise, Codman's pendulum exercise, Hoshino exercise, Isometric exercise, Isotonic exercise, Pritikin exercise, Vigorous exercise.
Exercise
Muscle
Isometric Exercise against an unmoving resistance; isometric exercises consist of muscle contraction with a minimum of other body movements; isometric exercises build muscle strength and include weight-lifting or squeezing a tennis ball
Isotonic Dynamic exercise Isotonic exercise consists of continuous and sustained movement of the arms and legs; isotonic exercises are beneficial to the cardiorespiratory systems and include running and bicycling
Whole body
Low-impact aerobics Any type of aerobic exercise that promotes physical fitness, but does not stress musculoskeletal tissues, and joints; low-impact aerobic exercises include walking, swimming, bicycling
High-impact aerobics Any type of aerobic exercise that promotes physical fitness, at the risk of stress to musculoskeletal tissues, and joints; high-impact aerobic exercises include aerobic dancing, basketball, running, volleyball
Exercise-kcal consumed/hour
Distance running (15 km/hour)  1000
Contact sports (wrestling, karate)   900
Bicycling (25 km/hour)   800
Swimming, freestyle   800
Basketball, volleyball  700
Jogging (9 km/hour)  600
Tennis   500
Coitus   450
Walking  400

i·so·met·ric

(ī'sō-met'rik)
1. Of equal dimensions.
2. physiology Denoting the condition when the ends of a contracting muscle are held fixed so that contraction produces increased tension at a constant overall length.
Compare: auxotonic, isotonic (3) , isovolumic
[iso- + G. metron, measure]

isometric

1. Of equal dimensions or length.
2. Of muscular tightening, in which an increase in tension occurs without shortening.

isometric

  1. of similar or equal measure.
  2. pertaining to a muscle under tension without contraction or change in length.

isometric (īˈ·sō·meˑ·trik),

n muscle contraction that does not involve any change in the muscle length.

iso·met·ric

(ī'sō-met'rik)
Of equal dimensions.
[iso- + G. metron, measure]

isometric

maintaining, or pertaining to, the same length; of equal dimensions.

isometric contraction
muscle contraction without appreciable shortening or change in distance between its origin and insertion.
isometric exercise
active exercise performed against stable resistance, without change in the length of the muscle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Because the postsmolts were growing isometrically with little energy storage, Fulton's K was unable to distinguish between fast and slow growers within the fed treatment, and K values of fed fish were significantly higher than those of fasted fish only on the final day of sampling (day 23).
p]-spaces can be linearly isometrically extended for 0 < p < [infinity] and p [not equal to] 2.
5-512 [micro]g/ml) were recorded isometrically on a Mac Lab data acquisition system, running chart v3.
In contrast, when contracting concentrically or isometrically, the shortening of the muscle would slack the intrafusal fibers of the muscle spindle; therefore, the central nervous system would attempt to increase the tension of the muscle spindle and acquire enough Ia afferent feedback via alpha-gamma coactivation rather than inhibit the motor neuron pool.
The crossbeam is used isometrically which means the subject must fight to not follow the movement the bar imposes.
The untransformed versions of the 32 variables that explained the highest proportion of variance in the DFA were regressed against length (standard length [SL]) for each species to determine whether the traits differed allometrically or isometrically.
Hip abduction/adduction was assessed isometrically in a sidelying, neutral hip position.
Physical exam can reveal pain with opposed wrist dorsiflexion, "Maudsley's sign," which is pain on isometrically opposed extension at the middle finger, as well tenderness to palpation over the lateral epicondyle.
1](J) [cross product] V isometrically, similarly for other Hilbert spaces.
Prior to maximal test, the subjects were asked to exert submaximal force isometrically at each of the test positions to familiarize themselves with the test procedure.
Among the topics are coincidence and fixed points of fuzzy mappings, topological monads from functional quasi-uniformities, topological entropy and algebraic entropy for group endomorphisms, some problems in isometrically universal spaces, and the topological vector space of continuous functions with the weak set-open topology.
Results are consistent with the classical inverse relationship between torque (force) and velocity in that both PT and AVT were greatest when tested isometrically, followed by dynamic contractions at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 s-1 (Table 1).