isometric contraction


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Related to isometric contraction: isometric muscle contraction

contraction

 [kon-trak´shun]
a drawing together; a shortening or shrinkage.
Braxton Hicks c's see braxton hicks contractions.
carpopedal contraction the condition resulting from chronic shortening of the muscles of the upper and lower limbs including the fingers and toes, seen in tetany.
concentric contraction contraction resulting in shortening of a muscle, used to perform positive work or to accelerate a body part. It is metabolically more demanding than an eccentric contraction. Called also shortening contraction.
Dupuytren's contraction Dupuytren's contracture.
eccentric contraction contraction in the presence of a resistive force that results in elongation of a muscle, used to perform negative work or to decelerate a body part. It is less metabolically demanding than a concentric contraction but may cause disruption of associated connective tissue with delayed soreness or frank injury if it occurs in an unaccustomed manner. Called also lengthening contraction.
end-diastolic premature ventricular contraction a ventricular ectopic beat falling at the end of diastole; it may or may not be slightly premature and may or may not be a fusion beat.
haustral c's muscular contractions of the wall of the large intestine during which the haustra can be seen more easily; called also haustrations.
isometric contraction muscle contraction without appreciable shortening or change in distance between its origin and insertion.
isotonic contraction muscle contraction without appreciable change in the force of contraction; the distance between the origin and insertion becomes lessened.
lengthening contraction eccentric contraction.
postural contraction the state of muscular tension and contraction that just suffices to maintain the posture of the body.
segmental c's muscular contractions of the small intestine that serve to mix and transport chyme.
shortening contraction concentric contraction.
contraction stress test observation of the fetal heart rate in response to uterine contractions; see also fetal monitoring.
tetanic contraction (tonic contraction) physiological tetanus.
Volkmann's contraction Volkmann's contracture.

i·so·met·ric con·trac·tion

force development at constant length. Compare: isotonic contraction.

isometric contraction

Etymology: Gk, isos, equal, metron, measure; L, contractio, a drawing together
muscular contraction not accompanied by movement of the joint. Resistance applied to the contraction increases muscle tension without producing movement of the joint. Also called muscle-setting exercise.

i·so·met·ric con·trac·tion

(ī'sō-met'rik kŏn-trak'shŭn)
Force development at constant length.
Compare: isotonic contraction

isometric contraction

contraction in which a muscle stays at the same length, e.g. when holding a weight steady; isometric exercise (syn static exercise) exercise in which this condition obtains. See also force-velocity relationship.

isometric

maintaining, or pertaining to, the same length; of equal dimensions.

isometric contraction
muscle contraction without appreciable shortening or change in distance between its origin and insertion.
isometric exercise
active exercise performed against stable resistance, without change in the length of the muscle.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ito M, Kawakami Y, Ichinose Y, Fukashiro S, Fukunaga T (1998) Nonisometric behavior of fascicles during isometric contractions of a human muscle.
Isometric contractions involve applying resistance to joint movement such that no movement occurs.
A number of investigators have examined the development of localized muscle fatigue in the forearms during sustained and repeated isometric contractions.
Type 2 diabetes mellitus patients manifest characteristic spatial EMG potential distribution pattern during sustained isometric contraction.
Patients with LV systolic dysfunction had increased E/A ratio, prolonged isometric contraction time and decreased E deceleration time.
To facilitate comparison between studies, maximum voluntary isometric contractions (MVCs) were performed to normalize the EMG signals [11-12].
38) Central motor drive may adjust to match the force generating capacity of the muscle fibers during slow movements and isometric contractions.
EMG signals were recorded as participants carried out isometric contractions with their upper trapezius muscle.
The mean of the RMS value generated in the muscles during the isometric contraction was reconstructed in a dispersion graph, and had an associated required torque with weights of 2, 4, 6, and 8 kg.
One end of the aorta was attached to a force-displacement transducer (Kishimoto UM-203) so that its isometric contraction could be recorded (NEC RECHI HORIZ-8 K, Tokyo, Japan).
Surface EMG activity was recorded from the vastus lateralis, medial hamstring, medial gastrocnemius and gluteus maximus and subsequently normalised to a maximal voluntary isometric contraction from these muscles, thus EMG activity during the exercises could be expressed as a percentage of maximal effort EMG activity.
In fact, an isometric contraction (zero movement speed) can be performed fast or explosively with maximum voluntary effort.