isometric


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isometric

 [i″so-met´rik]
maintaining, or pertaining to, the same length; of equal dimensions.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

i·so·met·ric

(ī'sō-met'rik),
1. Of equal dimensions.
2. In physiology, denoting the condition when the ends of a contracting muscle are held fixed so that contraction produces increased tension at a constant overall length. Compare: auxotonic, isotonic (3), isovolumic.
[iso- + G. metron, measure]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

isometric

(ī′sə-mĕt′rĭk)
adj. also i′somet′rical (-rĭ-kəl)
1. Of or exhibiting equality in dimensions or measurements.
2. Of or being a crystal system of three equal axes lying at right angles to each other.
3. Physiology Of or involving muscular contraction against resistance in which the length of the muscle remains the same.
n.
A line connecting isometric points.

i′so·met′ri·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

exercise

Public health The rhythmic contraction of muscles against a force Pros ↓ risk of cholecystectomy, ↓ risk of CAD, CHD, CA–colorectal, breast, prostate, DM–improved insulin utilization, obesity, stroke, osteoporosis, stress, anxiety; ↑ sexual pleasure, strength, flexibility, stamina, psychological well-being, general health; improved reaction time, memory, moods, immune resistance, sleep, self-confidence, control of arthritis, weight, quality of life. See Aerobic exercise, Anaerobic exercise, Breathing exercise, Cardiovascular exercise, Codman's pendulum exercise, Hoshino exercise, Isometric exercise, Isotonic exercise, Pritikin exercise, Vigorous exercise.
Exercise
Muscle
Isometric Exercise against an unmoving resistance; isometric exercises consist of muscle contraction with a minimum of other body movements; isometric exercises build muscle strength and include weight-lifting or squeezing a tennis ball
Isotonic Dynamic exercise Isotonic exercise consists of continuous and sustained movement of the arms and legs; isotonic exercises are beneficial to the cardiorespiratory systems and include running and bicycling
Whole body
Low-impact aerobics Any type of aerobic exercise that promotes physical fitness, but does not stress musculoskeletal tissues, and joints; low-impact aerobic exercises include walking, swimming, bicycling
High-impact aerobics Any type of aerobic exercise that promotes physical fitness, at the risk of stress to musculoskeletal tissues, and joints; high-impact aerobic exercises include aerobic dancing, basketball, running, volleyball
Exercise-kcal consumed/hour
Distance running (15 km/hour)  1000
Contact sports (wrestling, karate)   900
Bicycling (25 km/hour)   800
Swimming, freestyle   800
Basketball, volleyball  700
Jogging (9 km/hour)  600
Tennis   500
Coitus   450
Walking  400
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

i·so·met·ric

(ī'sō-met'rik)
1. Of equal dimensions.
2. physiology Denoting the condition when the ends of a contracting muscle are held fixed so that contraction produces increased tension at a constant overall length.
Compare: auxotonic, isotonic (3) , isovolumic
[iso- + G. metron, measure]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

isometric

1. Of equal dimensions or length.
2. Of muscular tightening, in which an increase in tension occurs without shortening.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

isometric

  1. of similar or equal measure.
  2. pertaining to a muscle under tension without contraction or change in length.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

iso·met·ric

(ī'sō-met'rik)
Of equal dimensions.
[iso- + G. metron, measure]
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
This suggest that shoulder IR maximal voluntary isometric strength test is more reliable than the shoulder ER test, but the effect of the stabilisation system needs to be studied in future studies with multifactor designs.
An element f of F is said to be a Riemannian product of two curves in [R.sup.4] if f is equivalent to an isometric immersion a in Example 1, or to an isometric immersion [beta] in Example 2.
The primary finding in this investigation is that strength-matched men and women do not differ in magnitude or ratio of muscle activity in an isometric multi-joint task.
Influence on isometric muscle contraction during shoulder abduction by changing occlusal situation.
We collected quantitative data on the isometric lumbar extension strength of individuals engaged in milk production, which represents a contribution to the literature, since it comprises few studies on this population of workers.
Our second hypothesis that "isometric exercise would not alter the isokinetic muscle strength or cartilage morphology, but would reduce symptoms and increase the functional capacity" was unable to be fully met.
Isometric operates 24/7 with two of its three shifts running unattended and "lights out." Highly consistent molding and automated cells help make this possible.
Peak force was defined as the maximal force achieved during the maximal isometric contraction and reported relative to body mass.
The average contractile force of the biceps brachii muscle (mean muscle load) was set at 25% of the maximum voluntary isometric force.
A study on diabetic Wistar rats weighing 200 to 220 gm displayed minimal effect on isometric twitch tension in diabetic rats13.
Research exploring the effects of isometric handgrip training on the resting blood pressure of younger normotensive adults has also produced similar results (SBP, -4 to -5 mmHg [14, 26]).
By Partington's results [20, 21], in each of the either cases, C([OMEGA]) contains an isometric copy of [l.sub.[infinity]].