isolate

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isolate

 [i´so-lāt]
1. to separate from others, or set apart.
2. a group of individuals prevented by geographic, genetic, ecologic, or social barriers from interbreeding with others of their kind.
3. a pure microbial strain that has been separated from a mixed laboratory culture.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

i·so·late

(ī'sō-lāt),
1. To separate, to set apart from others; that which is so treated.
2. To free of chemical contaminants.
3. In psychoanalysis, to separate ideas, experiences, or memories from the affects pertaining to them.
4. In group psychotherapy, a patient to whom others in the group do not respond.
5. Viable organisms separated on a single occasion from a sample taken from a host or culture system.
6. A population that for geographic, linguistic, cultural, social, religious, or other reasons is subject to little or no gene flow. Synonym(s): genetic isolate
[It. isolare; Mediev. L. insulo, pp. -atus, to insulate, fr. L. insula, island]
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

isolate

(ī′sə-lāt′)
v.
1. To set apart or cut off from others.
2. To place in quarantine.
3. To separate a pure strain from a mixed bacterial or fungal culture.
n. (-lĭt, -lāt′)
A bacterial or fungal strain that has been isolated.

i′so·la′tion (-lā′shən) n.
i′so·la′tor n.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

i·so·late

(ī'sŏ-lāt, ī'sŏ-lăt)
1. To separate, to set apart from others; that which is so treated.
2. To free of chemical contaminants.
3. psychoanalysis To separate experiences or memories from the affects pertaining to them.
4. group psychotherapy A person to whom others in the group do not respond.
5. Viable organisms separated on a single occasion from a field sample in experimental hosts, culture systems, or stabilates.
6. A population that for geographic, linguistic, cultural, social, religious, or other reasons is subject to little or no genetic flow.
[It. isolare; Mediev. L. insulo, pp. -atus, to insulate, fr. L. insula, island]
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

isolate

  1. to separate a microorganism from fresh material and to establish it in pure culture.
  2. a single pure culture of a microorganism.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The indispensable factor that leads to the global pharmaceutical isolator market growth is the need to prevent the contamination of pharmaceuticals.
Without an external power supply the USB isolator can source up to 200mA at the device port.
This ventilation ensures that the H2O2used for the isolator decontamination is removed quickly.
Providakis, "Effect of LRB isolators and supplemental viscous dampers on seismic isolated buildings under near-fault excitations," Engineering Structures, vol.
Table 1: Total disturbance reduction ratio, with and without isolators. Reduction rate [F.sub.x] [F.sub.y] [F.sub.z] Peak reduction (%) Max.
* Rubber or rubber-metal vibration isolators whose main working body of the rubber complex forms;
LVDS I/O, high-speed isolator and LDO for flexible 2.5/3.3V supply combined in a single SOIC-W package
Due to the labor intensive and time consuming process currently required to produce the thermoset isolators, there was an interest in developing an injection moldable thermoplastic version that could be manufactured at a lower cost.
The use of isolators is now widespread and they can be built in a wide range of materials, sizes and configurations.