isolate

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isolate

 [i´so-lāt]
1. to separate from others, or set apart.
2. a group of individuals prevented by geographic, genetic, ecologic, or social barriers from interbreeding with others of their kind.
3. a pure microbial strain that has been separated from a mixed laboratory culture.

i·so·late

(ī'sō-lāt),
1. To separate, to set apart from others; that which is so treated.
2. To free of chemical contaminants.
3. In psychoanalysis, to separate ideas, experiences, or memories from the affects pertaining to them.
4. In group psychotherapy, a patient to whom others in the group do not respond.
5. Viable organisms separated on a single occasion from a sample taken from a host or culture system.
6. A population that for geographic, linguistic, cultural, social, religious, or other reasons is subject to little or no gene flow. Synonym(s): genetic isolate
[It. isolare; Mediev. L. insulo, pp. -atus, to insulate, fr. L. insula, island]

isolate

/iso·late/ (i´sah-lāt)
1. to separate from others.
2. a group of individuals prevented by geographic, genetic, ecologic, social, or artificial barriers from interbreeding with others of their kind.

isolate

(ī′sə-lāt′)
v.
1. To set apart or cut off from others.
2. To place in quarantine.
3. To separate a pure strain from a mixed bacterial or fungal culture.
n. (-lĭt, -lāt′)
A bacterial or fungal strain that has been isolated.

i′so·la′tion (-lā′shən) n.
i′so·la′tor n.

isolate

[ī′səlāt]
Etymology: It, isolare, to detach
1 to separate a pure chemical substance from a mixture.
2 to derive from any source a pure culture of a microorganism.
3 to prevent an individual from having contact with the rest of a population.

i·so·late

(ī'sŏ-lāt, ī'sŏ-lăt)
1. To separate, to set apart from others; that which is so treated.
2. To free of chemical contaminants.
3. psychoanalysis To separate experiences or memories from the affects pertaining to them.
4. group psychotherapy A person to whom others in the group do not respond.
5. Viable organisms separated on a single occasion from a field sample in experimental hosts, culture systems, or stabilates.
6. A population that for geographic, linguistic, cultural, social, religious, or other reasons is subject to little or no genetic flow.
[It. isolare; Mediev. L. insulo, pp. -atus, to insulate, fr. L. insula, island]

isolate

  1. to separate a microorganism from fresh material and to establish it in pure culture.
  2. a single pure culture of a microorganism.

isolate (īˑ·s·lt),

n the term for a single component, which has been separated from a volatile mixture.

isolate

1. to separate from others, or set apart.
2. a group of individuals prevented by geographic, genetic, ecological or social barriers from interbreeding with others of their kind.
3. a population of microorganisms that has been obtained in pure culture from a field case or location.
References in periodicals archive ?
Culture, power, communication, and pedagogy are not as isolatable or autonomous as certain operationalizations imply.
The truth of the text is therefore found in its objectification of a discourse of knowledge on cultural difference that reveals the literary object in its identitarian vocation while consecrating it as an isolatable entity in a system of cultural participation.
Translation refers back to a second "world" under construction, an open work, and not the stacking up of isolatable entities.
3) Reading them might open up a critique of North American/ European feminist thought from a new direction, while countering hardening attitudes in European and North American public discourse that see Western liberalism and ideologies that are formulated through an Islamic discursive framework as opposed and largely isolatable formations.
However, beyond its conformity to the implications of entanglement, the wave-front model offers representations of a different subset of optical characteristics to that traditionally incorporated by an isolatable particle model.
Although twentieth-century interest in Newman's poetry waned, many Victorians with little sympathy for Tractarianism were in fact professedly won over by Newman's "poetry alone"--the "alone" part being a crucial component in their approval, at least as they understood it) (35) This early perception of the poem as a work made up of discrete, isolatable parts proved crucial to its acceptance--though it was by no means true that readers could perform a neat excision of the poem's theological content and achieve sanitized readings, as they believed.
Unconstrained Knowledge Accession--knowledge construction is the ability to recall specific and isolatable information from learned material (Bloom, 1956).
If art is imagined as distinct, it becomes pure aesthetic, more real as an isolated and isolatable phenomenon than the experiences and struggles of people and, thus, unreal.
Unable to harvest a broader movement, they became isolated in their activism and very isolatable by the police and federal authorities.
Audubon's naming in the previous passage from Creation reflects this ingrained necessity to deal with living beings as if they were substance, substantives, and therefore isolatable, objects that the mind fixes in separate terms for the purpose of knowledge.
Reading the literature on the theory of the criminal law would lead one to believe that "the criminal law" is an easily isolatable entity that is unique in its imposition of costs on citizens (punishments are costs).
that are not comparatist but destabilize the traditional concept of literature as an isolatable aesthetic object.