isokinetic


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isokinetic

 [i″so-kĭ-net´ik]
pertaining to a concentric or eccentric contraction of a muscle in which the speed and tension are constant throughout the range of lengthening or contracting.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the abundance of isokinetic research in medical literature involving joint rehabilitation, combined with consistently higher MSD reductions, as referenced by vendor and employer studies, appears to favor isokinetics for validity, objectivity and reliability.
Outcomes were measures of strength or power of any muscle group, including maximal weight lifted; peak power achieved in maximal (sprint) cycle ergometry; and peak knee flexion/extension torque in isokinetic dynamometer testing, measurements of endurance, such as time to fatigue on cycle ergometer and number of repetitions achieved in submaximal weight lifting, were excluded.
This conflicts with the findings of Karwowski and Mital (1986), who reported a decrease in the %sum with an increase (from two to three) in the number of men performing an isokinetic or isometric lift, but it supports the parallel study in women (Karwowski & Pongpatanasuegsa, 1988).
Moreover, it allows performing both isometric and isokinetic testing and despite the fact that no action in real life occurs at constant velocity, isokinetic testing provides a more natural movement condition due to its dynamic nature, whereby a maximal torque can be generated throughout the whole ROM.6 However, its elevated cost limits its widespread use in clinical practice.7 Hand-held dynamometers (HHDs) are usually used for strength assessment.
(1983) Effects of two speeds of isokinetic training on muscular strength, power and endurance.
During the isokinetic strength test, the vastus medialis (VM), vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris (RF), and biceps femoris (BF) muscle activity levels were measured.
In order to validate the enthalpy-entropy compensation theory, the Krug test (Eq.9) was applied to compare the isokinetic temperature ([T.sub.B]) with the mean harmonic temperature ([T.sub.hm]), whose approximate confidence interval (1-[alpha]; 100%) for the isokinetic temperature was calculated by Eq.
Then, we collected the data basically in the following two steps: 1) indirect measurements of hamstring muscle length (HML) and 2) isokinetic measurements for knee extensors.
Reproducibility of the time to peak torque and the joint angle at peak torque on knee of young sportsmen on the isokinetic dynamometer.
In this context, the isokinetic dynamometry represents the current state-of-the-art technique for assessing muscle dysfunction (16, 17).