isoenzyme

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isoenzyme

 [i″so-en´zīm]
any of several forms of an enzyme that all catalyze the same reaction but may differ in reaction rate, inhibition by various substances, electrophoretic mobility, or immunologic properties. Several enzymes, particularly alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase, have clinically important isoenzymes. Isoenzymes are separated by electrophoresis, and the pattern indicates which damaged organ has released the enzymes.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

i·so·en·zyme

(ī'sō-en'zīm),
An enzyme (one of a group) that catalyze the same reaction but may be differentiated by variations in physical properties, such as isoelectric point, electrophoretic mobility, kinetic parameters, or modes of regulation, for example, lactate dehydrogenase, a tetramer composed of varying amounts of α and β subunits (that is, 4α, 3α + 1β, 2α + 2β, 1α + 3β, and 4β).
Synonym(s): isozyme
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

isoenzyme

(ī′sō-ĕn′zīm′)
n.
An isoform that is an enzyme.

i′so·en·zy′mic adj.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

i·so·en·zyme

(ī'sō-en'zīm)
One of a group of enzymes that catalyze the same reaction but may be differentiated by variations in physical properties, such as isoelectric point, electrophoretic mobility, kinetic parameters, or modes of regulation.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

isoenzyme (isozyme)

one of a number of ENZYMES that catalyse the same reaction, but are qualitatively different from each other, for example in PRIMARY STRUCTURE.
Collins Dictionary of Biology, 3rd ed. © W. G. Hale, V. A. Saunders, J. P. Margham 2005

Isoenzyme

One of a group of enzymes that catalyze the same reaction but are differentiated by variations in physical properties.
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.