isocline


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i·so·cline

(ī'sō-klīn),
A line in a geographic region that joins all points at which in a population there is the same average frequency for the various alleles at a genetic locus.
See also: cline.
[iso- + G. klinō, to slope]
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References in periodicals archive ?
By (7) and the Implicit Function Theorem, the [Mathematical Expression Omitted] isocline does not shift, since [Mathematical Expression Omitted], while the [Mathematical Expression Omitted] isocline shifts up because [Mathematical Expression Omitted].
The isocline and full system analyses show similar patterns when there is variation in performance (Figs.
If so, the grazer isocline will shift upward and to the left (compare grazer isoclines in Fig.
We derived the following equation for the zero-growth isocline, equivalent to the self-thinning line, for a sampling area of 36 [cm.
The dynamics of the grazer-algae system are directly determined by the shape and relationship of the isoclines shown in Fig.
In the absence of resource exchange, the equilibrium point is where per-year consumption meets acquisition and is represented by the intersection of the isolation acquisition isocline and the consumption vector (points 1 in [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1A, B OMITTED]).
A simple way to visualize the growth response of a plant to the levels of two environmental factors is by plotting its zero isocline in the resource plane [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 1 OMITTED].
The shape of a gerbil isocline measured using principles of optimal habitat selection.
3B, we have depicted the plant isocline (given by dP/dt = 0) and the herbivore isoclines (given by dH/dt = 0) in the plant-herbivore plane.
Mean spring salinities at each deployment site showed the same relative longitudinal gradient during all years, but variations in freshwater inflow conditions caused locations of salinity isoclines to shift in both up- and downstream directions (Table 3).
The correspondings to this period, isoclines are shown in the figure 3.