flap

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flap

 [flap]
1. a mass of tissue for grafting, usually including skin, only partially removed from one part of the body so that it retains its own blood supply during transfer to another site.
2. an uncontrolled movement.
advancement flap sliding flap.
axial pattern flap a myocutaneous flap containing an artery in its long axis.
free flap an island flap detached from the body and reattached at the distant recipient site by microvascular anastomosis.
island flap a flap consisting of skin and subcutaneous tissue, with a pedicle made up of only the nutrient vessels.
jump flap one cut from the abdomen and attached to a flap of the same size on the forearm. The forearm flap is transferred later to some other part of the body to fill a defect there.
myocutaneous flap a compound flap of skin and muscle with adequate vascularity to permit sufficient tissue to be transferred to the recipient site. See also axial pattern flap and random pattern flap.
pedicle flap a flap consisting of the full thickness of the skin and the subcutaneous tissue, attached by tissue through which it receives its blood supply. Called also pedicle graft.
random pattern flap a myocutaneous flap with a random pattern of arteries, as opposed to an axial pattern flap.
rope flap tube flap.
rotation flap a local pedicle flap whose width is increased by having the edge distal to the defect form a curved line; the flap is then rotated and a counterincision is made at the base of the curved line, which increases the mobility of the flap.
skin flap a full-thickness mass or flap of tissue containing epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous tissue.
sliding flap a flap carried to its new position by a sliding technique; called also advancement flap.
tube flap (tubed pedicle flap) a bipedicle flap made by elevating a long strip of tissue from its bed except at the two extremities, the cut edges then being sutured together to form a tube.

FLAP

(flap),

flap

(flap),
1. Tissue for transplantation, vascularized by a pedicle flap.
See also: local flap, distant flap, free flap.
2. An uncontrolled movement, as of the hands.
[M.E. flappe]

flap

(flăp)
n.
A piece of tissue that has been partially detached and used in surgical grafting to fill an adjacent defect or cover the cut end of a bone after amputation.

flap

Plastic surgery A pedicle of tissue used to cover a defect, usually of the skin. See Frechet flap, TRAM flap.

flap

(flap)
1. Mass of partially detached tissue.
See also: pedicle flap, local flap, distant flap
2. An uncontrolled movement, as of the hands.
See: asterixis
[M.E. flappe]

flap

A partially detached segment of skin and underlying tissue, having an adequate blood supply, so that it can be extended or rotated to fill an adjacent tissue deficit. Flaps are still extensively used in plastic surgery.

Flap

A section of tissue moved from one area of the body to another.
Mentioned in: Breast Reconstruction

flap

(flap)
1. Tissue for transplantation, vascularized by a pedicle flap.
2. An uncontrolled movement, as of the hands.
[M.E. flappe]

Patient discussion about flap

Q. My son displays behavior such as hooting, screeching, flapping arms, "chicken" dancing, rocking... Hi members, please help me to choose the right way. My son displays behavior such as hooting, screeching, flapping arms, "chicken" dancing, rocking, bouncing, jumping, limited repetitive play skills, low self esteem, difficulty commencing and occasionally sustaining adult directed tasks, difficulty maintaining relationships with adults and peers, he becomes easily frustrated and will become physically and verbally aggressive, can overreact to being touched, easily distracted by noise, short attention span, likes routine and finds it difficult to change task, difficulty listening, and difficulty following verbal instructions. He is like this at home and school. I have been told by the local NHS group that he is not autistic because of his parent’s separation and divorce in his early life and he does not present these behaviors as a "pervasive feature". Instead they suggest he needs a hearing check and he has "neuro developmental immaturities". What is your opinion? Should I get a second opinion?

A. if you ask me - they could be right. anyway i would be careful from over-the-net-diagnosis. their specialist saw the child and examined his behavior, he probably know what he is doing. and even if you are not sure- get a second opinion. can't hurt can it?

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