ischemic pain

ischemic pain

unpleasant, often excruciating pain associated with decreased blood flow caused by mechanical obstruction, constricting orthopedic casts, or insufficient blood flow that results from injury or surgical trauma. Ischemic pain caused by occlusive arterial disease is often severe and may not be relieved, even with narcotics. The individual with peripheral vascular disease may experience ischemic pain only while exercising because the metabolic demands for oxygen cannot be met as a result of occluded blood flow. The ischemic pain of partial arterial occlusion is not as severe as the abrupt, excruciating pain associated with complete occlusion, such as by an embolus or thrombus. See also pain intervention.

rest pain

(rest pān)
Unrelenting ischemic pain in an extremity at rest, indicating severe arterial insufficiency.
Synonym(s): ischemic pain.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Spinal neurostimulation for chronic and ischemic pain management is based on the following principles, except for:
Data from the two Phase 1 studies showed a favorable safety profile and promising data on amputation free survival one year after treatment, improved tissue perfusion, and a reduction of ischemic pain at rest.
More importantly, the physicians should have recognized the typical story of myocardial ischemic pain and managed the patient as someone with an acute coronary syndrome despite his young age and a near-normal ECG.
5) Likely complications include ischemia and ischemic pain after embolization, and recanalization of vessels.
Disease states that have been shown to be responsive to stimulation include failed back surgery syndrome, spinal radiculopathy, ischemic pain, peripheral neuropathy, post herpetic neuritis, traumatic nerve injury, and complex regional pain syndrome.
Burger's disease is a peripheral vascular disorder characterized by constricted blood flow, ischemic pain, and necrotizing tissue processes.
Thermal heat and ischemic pain threshold tolerance was also evaluated in all study participants.
Systemic antibiotics are indicated in patients with CLI and gangrene or skin ulceration, and intravenous prostaglandin E-1 for 7-28 days can reduce ischemic pain and facilitate ulcer healing in a subset of patients with CLI.
For example, one type of discomfort, called ischemic pain, occurs when muscle tissue doesn't have enough oxygen to continue working.
Both guidelines are consistent: The NICE guideline assesses the use of neurostimulation in patients with neuropathic pain or pain of ischemic origin and recommends it in adults of neuropathic pain of any origin, including PPSS, except in ischemic pain.
CLI was defined as persistent, recurring ischemic pain for at least two weeks, or ulcerations (grade 4 or 5 on the Wagner scale) or gangrene of the foot or toe.